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I am looking for the best way to go about testing the following static method (specifically using a Doctrine Model):

class Model_User extends Doctrine_Record
{
    public static function create($userData)
    {
        $newUser = new self();
        $newUser->fromArray($userData);
        $newUser->save();
    }
}

Ideally, I would use a mock object to ensure that "fromArray" (with the supplied user data) and "save" were called, but that's not possible as the method is static.

Any suggestions?

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4 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Sebastian Bergmann, the author of PHPUnit, recently had a blog post about Stubbing and Mocking Static Methods. With PHPUnit 3.5 and PHP 5.3 as well as consistent use of late static binding, you can do

$class::staticExpects($this->any())
      ->method('helper')
      ->will($this->returnValue('bar'));

Update: staticExpects is deprecated as of PHPUnit 3.8 and will be removed completely with later versions. See https://github.com/sebastianbergmann/phpunit-documentation/issues/77

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5  
Worth noting "This approach only works for the stubbing and mocking of static method calls where caller and callee are in the same class. This is because static methods are death to testability." –  Brad Koch Oct 1 '12 at 15:30
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Testing static methods is generally considered as a bit hard (as you probably already noticed), especially before PHP 5.3.

Could you not modify your code to not use static a method ? I don't really see why you're using a static method here, in fact ; this could probably be re-written to some non-static code, could it not ?


For instance, could something like this not do the trick :

class Model_User extends Doctrine_Record
{
    public function saveFromArray($userData)
    {
        $this->fromArray($userData);
        $this->save();
    }
}

Not sure what you'll be testing ; but, at least, no static method anymore...

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Thanks for the suggestion, it's more style than anything. I could make the method non static in this particular instance (though I'd prefer being able to use it without instantiating). –  rr. Mar 1 '10 at 18:02
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Try refactoring to use a dynamic class name instead, i.e:

class UserModel extends Doctrine_Record
{
    protected static $_modelclass;

    static function create ( $data )
    {
        $modelclass = ( is_null(self::$_modelclass) ? 
            get_class(self) : self::$_modelclass
        );

        $model = new $modelclass;
        $model->fromArray($data);
        $model->save();

        return $model;
    }
 } // END UserModel

Thus, you can set the static property to your mock when creating the mock. You might even consider refactoring that ternary operator to an accessor. It's not exactly elegant, but neither are static methods and properties in PHP. :[

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There is now the AspectMock library to help with this:

https://github.com/Codeception/AspectMock

$this->assertEquals('users', UserModel::tableName());   
$userModel = test::double('UserModel', ['tableName' => 'my_users']);
$this->assertEquals('my_users', UserModel::tableName());
$userModel->verifyInvoked('tableName'); 
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