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So the problem is as follows: I'm using a third party client class to issue commands to an external system to retrieve data (fairly standard). The problem is that when I issue commands via an instance of this class, it uses a callback reference based on the function name in my code and the line number within that function from which it was called, it then serializes this and other information into JSON and transmits to the external system for processing, with the data return being identified by the reference. This works "well" until we get to iteration, then the callback reference remains the same and I only receive data for one iteration. The third party isn't going to alter their code so I need a way of generating unique references in my code, but I'm unsure of how I can do this within C#. I can't edit their class as it is provided as a DLL, I can only access this system by using it (it is part of their SDK).

Any ideas greatly appreciated!

Example code:

[Note: actual code is part of a Windows Form Application]

The last part client.IsUserInGroup is the problem.

using thirdParty.Client;

class TestProgram
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Area and user objects defined within third party class
        List<Area> Areas = new List<Area>();
        List<User> myUsers = new List<User>();
        int publicAreaID = 0;
        bool isConnected=false;

        client.Connect("user", "pass",
            (connstatus) =>
            {
                switch (connstatus)
                {
                    case ConnectionStatus.Success:
                        isConnected = true;
                        Console.WriteLine("Connected");
                        break;

                    case ConnectionStatus.InvalidCredentials:
                        Console.WriteLine("InvalidCredentials");
                        break;

                    case ConnectionStatus.Timeout:
                        Console.WriteLine("Timeout");
                        break;
                }
            });

        if (isConnected)
        {
            client.GetAreas(
                    (result) =>
                    {
                        Areas = result;
                    });
            //Get ID of public area
            foreach (Area myArea in Areas)
            {
                if (myArea.Name.Equals("Public"))
                {
                    publicAreaID = myArea.ID;
                }
            }

            //Get all keyholders in Public area and store in list
            client.GetUsersInArea(publicAreaID,
                (result) =>
                {
                    myUsers = result;
                });

            //Iterate over all users in list and verify they are in the everyone group
            foreach (User myUser in myUsers)
            {
                User tempUser = myUser;
                client.IsUserInGroup(tempUser.ID, 0,
                    (result) =>
                    {
                        if (result)  //this is a bool
                        {
                            //This only returns one result..
                            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} is in Everyone Group and Public Area", tempUser.Name));
                        }
                    });
            }
            client.Disconnect();
        }
    }
}

UPDATE

I've been doing more testing by removing the foreach loop and just calling client.IsUserInGroup twice to generate alternative callback references; the results are interesting. As expected there are unique references, but there is still only one result displayed, the only way to get both is to create two User objects rather than reuse one. As mentioned above, the "real" code is used in a Windows forms app, could this be something to do with object referencing? Example code below:

new User tempUser1 = myUsers[0];
                client.IsUserInGroup(tempUser1.ID, 0,
                    (result) =>
                    {
                        if (result)  //this is a bool
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} is in Everyone Group and Public Area", tempUser1.Name));
                        }
                    });
new User tempUser2 = myUsers[1];
                client.IsUserInGroup(tempUser2.ID, 0,
                    (result) =>
                    {
                        if (result)  //this is a bool
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} is in Everyone Group and Public Area", tempUser2.Name));
                        }
                    });

FINAL UPDATE

Ok so I was playing with this a lot over the last few hours and kind of made it work by keeping the iterative loop but doing two things; firstly I assumed that the third party class would synchronize information requests and not allow my code to continue until it had a result returned - this seemingly is not the case as the output from recursion with an extra Console.WriteLine(iterationCount) in it shows the count increasing with no data returned; therefore I am forced to slow down the code by Thread.Sleep (I'm investigating better ways of doing this). Secondly any code within the lambda that could be moved outside, was. Instead a temp bool outside of the lambda was assigned the value of the result bool. The code looks like:

           //Iterate over all users in list and verify they are in the everyone group
            foreach (User myUser in myUsers)
            {
                User tempUser = myUser;
                bool tempRes = false;
                client.IsUserInGroup(tempUser.ID, 0,
                    (result) =>
                    {
                        tempRes = result;
                    });
                if (tempRes)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} is in Everyone Group and Public Area", tempUser.Name));
                }
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(75);  //Not a good way of enforcing sync!
            }
share|improve this question
    
This may be too abstract to answer without some code to demonstrate the problem. –  Magus May 9 '14 at 17:40
    
Wait, what version of the C# compiler do you use? This could be the well known issue of accessing a foreach iterator in a closure. –  Magus May 9 '14 at 18:08
    
Microsoft (R) Visual C# Compiler version 4.0.30319.18408 for Microsoft (R) .NET Framework 4.5 –  Inspired May 9 '14 at 18:13
    
I just tried it with a temp User holding myUser in the foreach iterator, no change; still the same issue. –  Inspired May 9 '14 at 18:41
    
Thanks Joel, I'll look into this as well. I just updated with how I've managed to get it working; it's not pretty! –  Inspired May 9 '14 at 21:30

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