Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to understand the NAPI enabled Network driver and have some doubts regarding the same.

If I talk about in layman's term whenever a network packets comes at the interface, it is notified to CPU and appropriate Ethernet driver(interrupt handler) code is executed.Ethernet driver code then copy the packet from Ethernet's Device memory to DMA buffers and finally packets are pushed to upper layer.

Is above true for NAPI disabled Ethernet driver?

Now for NAPI enabled Ethernet driver initially whenever packets comes at interface ,it is notified to CPU and appropriate Ethernet driver code (Interrupt handler) is executed .Inside the interrupt handler code we check if type of interrupt is received packet.

 if(statusword & SNULL_RX_INTER)
   snull_rx_ints(dev,0);//Disbale further interrupts
   netif_rx_schedule(dev);

What it mean by disabling further interrupts?

Is it mean packets are still captured by device and kept in device memory but not notified to CPU about the availability of these packets?

Also ,what it mean by CPU is pooling the device ,is it like CPU after every few second will run snull_poll() method and copy whatever number of packets are in device memory to DMA Buffer and pushed to Upper layer?

It would be great help if someone provides me clear picture on it.

share|improve this question
    
What driver is that code from? It's not in proper kernel coding style. –  sawdust May 9 '14 at 22:48
    
@sawdust I am reading LDD book and going through e1000 driver code. –  Amit Singh Tomar May 10 '14 at 7:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Now for NAPI enabled Ethernet driver initially whenever packets comes at interface ,it is notified to CPU and appropriate Ethernet driver code (Interrupt handler) is executed .Inside the interrupt handler code we check if type of interrupt is received packet.

What it mean by disabling further interrupts?

Normally a driver would clear the condition causing the interrupt. The NAPI driver, however, may also disable the receive interrupt when the ISR is done.
The assumption is that the arrival of one Ethernet frame may be the start of a burst or flood of frames. So instead of exiting interrupt mode and likely immediately reentering interrupt mode, why not test (i.e. poll) if more frames have already arrived?

Is it mean packets are still captured by device

Yes.
Each arriving frame is stored by the Ethernet controller in a frame buffer.

and kept in device memory

It's not typically "device memory".
It is typically a set of buffers (e.g. ring buffer) allocated in main memory assigned to the Ethernet controller.

but not notified to CPU about the availability of these packets?

Since the receive interrupt has been disabled, the NAPI driver is not notified of this event.
But since the driver is busy processing the previous frame, the interrupt request could not be serviced immediately anyway.

Also ,what it mean by CPU is pooling the device ,

Presumably you are actually asking about "polling"?
Polling simply means that the program (i.e. the driver) interrogates (i.e. reads and tests) status bit(s) for the condition it is waiting for.
If the condition is met, then it will process the event in a manner similar to an interrupt for that event.
If the condition is not met, then it may loop (in the generic case). But the NAPI driver, when the poll indicates that no more frames have arrived, will assume that the packet burst or flood is over, and will resume interrupt mode.

is it like CPU after every few second will run snull_poll() method and copy whatever number of packets are in device memory to DMA Buffer and pushed to Upper layer?

The NAPI driver would not delay or suspend itself for a "few second"s before polling.
The assumption is that Ethernet frames could be flooding the port, so the poll would be performed as soon as processing on the current frame is complete.

A possible bug in a NAPI driver is called "rotting packet".
When the driver transitions from the poll mode back to interrupt mode, a frame could arrive during this transition and be undetected by the driver.
Not until another frame arrives (and generates an interrupt) would the previous frame be "found" and processed by the NAPI driver.

BTW
You consistently write statements or questions similar to "the CPU does ..." or "notified to CPU".
The CPU is always (when not sleeping or powered off) executing machine instructions.
You should be concerned about to which logical entity (i.e. which program or source code module) those instructions belong.
You're asking software questions, so the fact that an interrupt causes a known, certain sequence by the CPU is a given and need not be mentioned.

ADDENDUM

I am just trying to understand drivers/net/ethernet/smsc/smsc911x.c in Linux source code.

The SMSC LAN911x Ethernet chips are more sophisticated than what I'm used to and have been describing above. Besides the MAC, these chips also have an integrated PHY, and have TX and RX FIFOs instead of using buffer ring or lists in main memory.

As per your suggestion I have started reading the SMSCLan9118 datasheet and trying to map it with smsc911x_irqhandler function where interrupt status (INT_STS) and interrupt enable (INT_EN) registers have been read but don't get how
if (likely(intsts & inten & INT_STS_RSFL_))
condition is checked here in line 1627.

INT_STS is defined in the header file as

#define INT_STS                         0x58

and the table in Section 5.3, System Control and Status Registers, in the datasheet lists the register at (relative) address 0x58 as

58h INT_STS Interrupt Status 

So the smsc911x device driver uses the exact same register name as the HW datasheet.
This 32-bit register is read using this register offset in the ISR using:

u32 intsts = smsc911x_reg_read(pdata, INT_STS);

So the 32 bits of the interrupt status (in variable intsts) is Boolean ANDed with the 32 bits of the interrupt mask (in variable inten).
This produces the interrupt status bits that the driver are actually interested in. This may also be good defensive programming in case the HW sets status bits anyway for interrupt conditions that have not been enabled (in the INT_EN register).
Then that if statement does another Boolean AND to extract the one bit (INT_STS_RSFL_) that is being checked.

5.3.3 INT_STS—Interrupt Status Register

RX Status FIFO Level Interrupt (RSFL).
Generated when the RX Status FIFO reaches the programmed level

The likely() operator is for compiler optimization to utilize branch prediction capabilities in the CPU. The driver's author is directing the compiler to optimize the code for a true result of the enclosed logic expression (e.g. the ANDing of three integers, which would indicate an interrupt condition that needs servicing).

Also on recieving the packet on interface which bit is set on which register.

My take on reading the LAN9118 datasheet is that there really is no interrupt specifically for the receipt of a frame.
Instead the host can be notified when the RX FIFO exceeds a threshold.

5.3.6 FIFO_INT—FIFO Level Interrupts

RX Status Level.
The value in this field sets the level, in number of DWORDs, at which the RX Status FIFO Level interrupt (RSFL) will be generated. 
When the RX Status FIFO used space is greater than this value an RX Status FIFO Level interrupt (RSFL) will be generated. 

The smsc911x driver apparently uses this threshold at its default value of zero.
Each entry in the RX Status FIFO occupies a DWORD. The default value of this threshold is 0x00 (i.e. interrupt on "first" frame). If this threshold is more than zero, then there is the possibility of "rotting packets".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @sawdust your answer is quite helpful for me.Let me just rephrase my understanding again after going through your answer,When packet is first received at the interface, CPU core is notified of it through interrupt line,CPU core is then schedule(how it schedule?) the particular driver code and driver's ISR is called where if interrupt type is received packet then disable further interrupt and schedule NAPI poll function,In between all that there could be 100's of packets collected in device's memory which would be handled in poll mode,Am I on right track? –  Amit Singh Tomar May 12 '14 at 6:50
    
The Ethernet controller generates a receive interrupt after the frame has been stored in a memory buffer. The interrupt may be processed by an "advanced interrupt controller" or wired to a specific interrupt pin. There may be a language issue, or you need to take a computer architecture course. A HW interrupt is not scheduled. An "interrupt" means "suspend whatever you are doing right now, and instead do this (the ISR)!!!" Of course there are some constraints such as interrupt priority and masks. Hundreds of packets is an exaggeration; ring buffers are not that deep. –  sawdust May 12 '14 at 7:59
    
OK fine ,HW interrupt is not scheduled but whenever come core will run an IRQ handler which in turn call the device specific handler after reading the source of interrupt in status register of Interrupt controller.Also would to tell me when you say program (i.e. the driver) interrogates (i.e. reads and tests) status bit(s) for the condition ,Is driver code checking the "received packet" bit in device's status register? –  Amit Singh Tomar May 12 '14 at 8:15
    
"Is driver code checking the "received packet" bit in device's status register?" -- That could be Ethernet controller specific, but typically there are status indicators that one or more unprocessed (i.e. received but not removed) frames are in the ring buffer. Polling means that the driver will explicitly examine these status indicators, instead of "notification" of a condition by interrupt. I'm intentionally being vague, because there have been many different implementations of doing this in HW & SW. Or do you have specific HW in mind with a driver that is available online? –  sawdust May 12 '14 at 9:17
    
I am just trying to understand drivers/net/ethernet/smsc/smsc911x.c in Linux source code. –  Amit Singh Tomar May 12 '14 at 9:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.