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When developing any kind of API wrapper, there are some problems with traditional caching. First, shorter cache times mean more up-to-date data, but they also minimize the benefits of caching. Secondly, any request which returns an expired cache result needs to wait for a new request. I've been thinking through how to solve these problems and I've devised a solution, but I'm sure it's already a thing. Just wondering if there's a name for it.

My Solution

  • User A generates an original request. Because no previously-cached copy exists, the user waits for the wrapper to contact the upstream API and return the data. The result is cached.
  • User B generates the same request a little later. The wrapper serves the cached result from User A, but then goes out and fetches a new result and overwrites the cached copy. User B doesn't see the updated result, but it's there for the next user. So User C sees that version, and so on.
  • User X makes a request after a significantly long time (days, maybe, depending on the nature of the data). Because the cached copy is effectively worthless, a fresh upstream request occurs as with User A.

With this scheme, most users never have to wait for an upstream request, and everyone is seeing reasonably recent data. Seems like a pretty efficient system to me. If I had to give it a name, I'd probably choose postfetching.

So, is there a name for this?

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1 Answer 1

It could be considered a form of read-through cache, but it would potentially result in stale cache results being returned.

Specifically...

  • User B generates the same request a little later. The wrapper serves the cached result from User A, but then goes out and fetches a new result and overwrites the cached copy. User B doesn't see the updated result, but it's there for the next user. So User C sees that version, and so on.

This results in User B (User C, etc...) potentially receiving a stale record from the cache.

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I left out the details in my OP, but for my application this is not a major concern. Really, any caching scheme's suitability for a particular application is highly dependent on the nature if the data in question. –  njbair May 10 at 0:23
    
It could be considered a form of read-through cache (distinct from write-through) with lazy asynchronous fetch and window based eviction policy. However, it wouldn't be considered a general caching solution. –  Jason May 10 at 1:54

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