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In the code below I am trying to understand the behavior of the method assigned to the prototype object and those defined at the object definition of the function Vehicle:

function Vehicle(theMake) {
    var make = theMake;
    //this. attachs "make" to this instance of 
    //the object Vehicle which is infact an object of type Object
    this.getInfo = function () {
        return 'Local definition of getInfo,  Vehicle: ' + make;
    };

}
Vehicle.prototype.getInfo = function () {
    //prototype will not have access to the variable make 
    return 'Overriding getInfo for all instances of Vehicle';// which later I realized is just the opposite( check the selected answer)
}


var car1 = new Vehicle('Honda');
alert(car1.getInfo());//Displays: Local definition of getInfo,  Vehicle: Honda 

1- Despite providing the definition of Vahicle.prototype.getInfo(), why the car1.getInfo() will be invoked? ( the local copy not the generic one?) why it ie being ignored?

If i remove the "this.getInfo = function()..." then the generic getInfo will be invoked by car1.getInfo()

2-How can I invoke the car1.prototype.getInfo())? If I call it like car1.prototype.getInfo().call the interpreter says: Unable to get property 'getInfo' of undefined or null reference

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should be assigning getInfo in only one place. Either in the prototype or in the constructor (preferably prototype), but NOT both places.

If you do both, the one assigned in the constructor will take precedence because it is assigned to the actual object which is searched first (before the prototype is searched). The prototype is only used if there is no property with the desired name already attached directly to the object. Because you've assigned a .getInfo property directly to the object in the constructor, the prototype is not searched when resolving that property name (because it's already found).

Since your code indicates that you think the .prototype version is the override, it appears that you just have that logic backwards. The getInfo() assigned to the object in the constructor is what overrides the prototype.

If you truly wanted to execute the prototype version, you could access it directly on the prototype:

Vehicle.prototope.getInfo.call(car1);

But, really if you want access to both methods, you should just given them different names so they are both accessible as car1.method1() and car1.method2().


So to summarize from your specific questions:

1- Despite providing the definition of Vahicle.prototype.getInfo(), why the car1.getInfo() will be invoked? ( the local copy not the generic one?) why it ie being ignored?

The object itself is searched before the prototype so the getInfo assigned directly to the object in the constructor will be found by the interpreter first and the prototype will not be searched.

2-How can I invoke the car1.prototype.getInfo())? If I call it like car1.prototype.getInfo().call the interpreter says: Unable to get property 'getInfo' of undefined or null reference

The best solution is to give the two functions different names so they are both callable in the conventional way. If you absolutely have to call the prototype version, you can do so as Vehicle.prototope.getInfo.call(car1);.


One might ask, why are you giving these two functions the same property name? That's what is creating the problem in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
So to the correct statement is that constructor methods do not override prototype methods they simply take precedence over prototype methods when same method being invoked. Therefore both can coexist. – C graphics May 10 '14 at 0:25
    
@Cgraphics - I don't know why you say they "don't override". If you call that method in the normal way, the constructor-assigned method is the one that will be executed because it is found first (some people would call that an override). Calling it precedence/override is more of a terminology issue than anything else - as long as you understand what's actually happening, you're good. – jfriend00 May 10 '14 at 0:29
    
agree about the terminology issue and that is in fact the point for me to understand it better. I am a Java dev and override means the previous one is removed from memory (overridden and no coexistence ), but thats not the case here. – C graphics May 10 '14 at 3:48
1  
@Cgraphics - I don't know Java, but in C++, you can define an override in a derived class, but still call the base class method by referencing it specifically. That's kind of analogous to what you have here (different syntax obviously and prototype instead of base class, but similar in concept). FYI, I found that I started to understand javascript better when I stopped trying to compare everything to constructs I knew in C++ and just started learning good javascript design patterns from scratch. – jfriend00 May 10 '14 at 3:53

The prototype chain allows the object to delegate to it's prototype when there is a failed lookup on the constructor. You have provided an instance where there will not be a failed lookup, so there is no need for it to look up the method on the prototype.

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