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I was just wondering about this. Why do <a> tags actually exist? Surely the better way to add a link to an element is by allowing an href on any element so that it can function as a link to another place.

For example say, currently you have an album:

<div class="album">
  <a class="album__link" href="[url]">
    <img src="[source]" class="album__photo" />
    <h2 class="album__title">[title]</h2>
  </a>
</div>

Surely the above could be better written like:

<div class="album" href="[url]">
  <img src="[source]" class="album__photo" />
  <h2 class="album__title">[title]</h2>
</div>

Just wondered what everyones thoughts on this were. Might be a silly question but if I don't ask then I won;t get to hear what anyone else thinks will I?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mark Bertenshaw, kapa, Patrick Hofman, Tom Fenech, greg-449 May 10 '14 at 10:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Different tags give the rendering device and or reading device ( like search engines) information about the page. You can write most html with a simply div tag if you want, but all the other tags combine to translate information to the browsers etc. –  William May 10 '14 at 9:39
    
This question is not fit for a Q&A site like Stack Overflow. Opinion-based questions are offtopic. Just wondered what everyones thoughts on this were and hear what anyone else thinks are signs that your "question" cannot really be answered. –  kapa May 10 '14 at 9:42

3 Answers 3

You can already do

<a class="album" href="[url]">
  <img src="[source]" class="album__photo" />
  <h2 class="album__title">[title]</h2>
</a>

in HTML5. What is the problem with this? A <div> does not have any meaning, so I don't think it is necessary here. If you need a block container, just set display: block on your link (.album) from CSS.

What makes you think <a> is an unnecessary tag? Are there any necessary tags in your view? How do you plan supporting link-related features that are currently handled by <a> (target, rel, hreflang, etc.)?

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Would it be valid HTML5 code? In earlier versions you shouldn't place as here h2 in a, so it was necessary to create 2 links - one for image, one for h2 inside it –  Marcin Nabiałek May 10 '14 at 9:40
1  
@MarcinNabiałek It is valid. There is a link in my answer to the HTML5 spec, it says: Although previous versions of HTML restricted the a element to only containing phrasing content (essentially, what was in previous versions referred to as “inline” content), the a element is now transparent; that is, an instance of the a element is now allowed to also contain flow content (essentially, what was in previous versions referred to as “block” content)—if the parent element of that instance of the a element is an element that is allowed to contain flow content. –  kapa May 10 '14 at 9:44

The idea of using href on any element was a feature of the now abandoned XHTML 2.0. However, it causes too many problems.

Many HTML elements already have click activation behaviour that would clash with the link behaviour, so web authors would have to remember which elements href could be used on, and which couldn't.

Also, the href attribute doesn't live on its own. It comes with others like target, download, rel, hreflang and type which would also need to be put on each element. That in turn would cause a clash with the meaning of the type attribute on other elements.

So it has been considered, and it's just too messy, compared with having a dedicated element to do the job.

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The difference between setting href="" to a <div> and an <a> is that they have different display types. On a <div> it will select the whole block (display: block;) so you can click everywhere in the div and open the link and on an <a> it will only select the text.

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1  
You can simply put display: inline on a div too. –  kapa May 10 '14 at 10:31

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