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I need an STL-like bidirectional iterator (operator<, begin(), rbegin(), end(), rend()) as an inner class to the following (I already spent considerable time all by myself to put together a working tree from a C# article in J of Object Tech and translated it to C++):

template<typename K, typename V> class rbtree {  
public:  
  rbtree(){  
    root = NULL;  
    numberElements = 0;  
    insertedNode = NULL;  
    nodeBeingDeleted = NULL; // Set in DeleteNode  
    siblingToRight = false; // Sibling of curNode  
    parentToRight = false; // Of grand parent  
    nodeToDeleteRed = false; // Color of deleted node  
  }  
  //...  
private:  
  struct Node {  
    // Fields  
    K key; // Generic object held by each node  
    Node* left; Node* right; Node* parent; // Links to children and parent  
    bool red;// = true; // Color of node  
    // Constructor  
    Node(){  
      red = true;  
    }  
    Node(K key, Node* parent) {  
      this->key = key;  
      this->parent = parent;  
      left = NULL; right = NULL;  
      red = true;  
    }  
  };  
  // Fields  
  Node* root;  
  //...  
};
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Indent all code lines by four spaces (or more) for indentantion, syntax hilight and automatic escaping. –  Tronic Mar 1 '10 at 18:39
    
select your code and press the "101010" button –  f4. Mar 1 '10 at 18:40
    
This reads like a spec for a piece of contract programming, not a question... –  user9876 Mar 1 '10 at 18:42
    
Indeed, where is the question? –  Georg Fritzsche Mar 1 '10 at 18:42
    
I hope you did not forget to add the destructors after translating from C# –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 1 '10 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

You would be suprised to know that a std::set is implemented as an Red-Black Tree. What are your reasons for writing one yourself?

For a real answer: Writing iterators isn't trivial. You should read about the common differences between iterator requirements. This Stackoverflow question is a kind of duplicate of your question and gives useful hints.

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Reason for reinventing? Learning. (see comment above) Wouldn´t need to ask, if it was really trivial. Thx –  user282897 Mar 1 '10 at 19:35
    
@gue22: If you're learning, then going and asking for the answer doesn't exactly teach you a whole lot. Open up the source code for std::set<T> and you can see a working implementation all day long. –  Billy ONeal Mar 1 '10 at 23:56
    
Thanks, Billy, that´s what I´m going to try next. I simply hoped for a quick answer here, cuz I got an exam tomorrow and the deadline on Fri. –  user282897 Mar 2 '10 at 14:20

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