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I've got a table that people have been inserting into getting the primary key by doing a

SELECT max(id)+1 from table_a;

I want to add some records to that table using a INSERT INTO table_a SELECT ... FROM table_b, table_c ... simple SQL script, and I'm wondering how to generate the primary keys. My first thought was to create a temporary sequence, but Oracle evidently doesn't have a select setval to set the first value. So how do I get the current value of max(id)+1 to set the "start with" parameter to my sequence?

I found something on-line that I thought would work:

COLUMN S new_value st select max(id)+1 S from  table_a;
CREATE SEQUENCE cra_seq start with &st;

But it doesn't actually use st in the CREATE SEQUENCE but instead prompts me to enter it, which isn't what I need.

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2  
It's prompting you to enter a parameter because sql*plus escapes the "&". Put "set define off" as the first line of your script and try again. –  Nick Pierpoint Mar 2 '10 at 0:20
1  
Will you ever have an occasion when more than one person will insert into this table at the same time? If so, all the methods around using max(id) will fail as each concurrent session will end up with the same max id. How about just creating a sequence and use it as the source of your IDs for all table inserts? –  Nick Pierpoint Mar 2 '10 at 0:25
    
@Nick, believe me, I know just how horrible the "select max(id)" method is. I've been trying to convince them to change to a sequence, but the powers that be say "oh, we're changing to uuids next release, so this will be ok for now". –  Paul Tomblin Mar 2 '10 at 1:44
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is this something like what you want?

  1  declare
  2    id  integer;
  3  begin
  4    select max(rownum)+1 into id from dual;
  5    execute immediate 'create sequence myseq start with '||TO_CHAR(id);
  6* end;
  7  /
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That works as far as it goes, but the very next line now SQL*Developer is complaining that the line beginning with "INSERT" is in error, even though it's fine if I execute that line on its own. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 19:51
    
Error report: ORA-06550: line 8, column 1: PLS-00103: Encountered the symbol "INSERT" 06550. 00000 - "line %s, column %s:\n%s" *Cause: Usually a PL/SQL compilation error. *Action: –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 19:53
    
I think you need to create the sequence before you compile the procedure, then inside drop and recreate it. –  DCookie Mar 1 '10 at 19:58
    
@DCookie, that didn't help. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 20:10
    
Is your insert inside the procedure? –  DCookie Mar 1 '10 at 20:22
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Couldn't you use the row_number function like so:

Insert Destination( Id, ...)
Select row_number() over( order by TableA.Col1... ) + MaxDestination.MaxId + 1 Num
 , ....
From TableA, TableB,...
 Cross Join ( Select Max(Id) MaxId From Destination ) MaxDestination
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What's the purpose of the order by col1, col2 there? –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 19:59
    
Shoot, now it's telling "SQL command not properly ended". I've got insert into table_a (id, a, b, c) select row_number() over (order by b) + maxcra.maxid+1, d, e FROM table_b cross join (select max(id) as maxid from table_a) as maxcra where table_b.b = 'FOO'; –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 20:19
    
Col1, Col2 represent placeholders for column.s The order by clause simply tells the system how to order the results to determine the row_number. If you had a column called Name and wanted the lowest sorted Name to have the lowest row number, you would use Order By Name. I think you need to change "order by b" to "order by table_b.b" however, I'll look at further here. –  Thomas Mar 1 '10 at 21:13
    
I've posted a correction. In short, Oracle did not like the use of the "as" keyword. –  Thomas Mar 1 '10 at 22:13
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You can use the row_number analytical function to generate row numbers (1 through N).

Before you do the insert, get the max id that is in the table, and then add the row number to that max and it will populate your table correctly.

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I have no idea how to "get the max id" in a sql script. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 19:27
    
@Paul Tomblin: I suggest you look at the "max" function in SQL. –  casperOne Mar 1 '10 at 20:01
    
I know how to display a max id, I don't know how to use it the way you suggest. It seems like you're talking about selecting it into a variable, and I have no idea how you do that in a sql script. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 1 '10 at 20:05
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In PostgreSQL:

CREATE SEQUENCE new_seq;
ALTER TABLE existing_table ADD COLUMN new_serial_column bigint DEFAULT 0;
UPDATE existing_table SET new_serial_column = nextval('new_seq');
ALTER TABLE existing_table ALTER COLUMN new_serial_column SET NOT NULL;
ALTER TABLE existing_table ALTER COLUMN new_serial_column SET DEFAULT nextval('new_seq');

Although, that code is not idempotent, so check you havn't already created the new sequence, something like:

CREATE FUNCTION fixup_existing_table() RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    new_id bigint;
    seq_column_exists integer;
BEGIN
    SELECT Count(column_name) INTO seq_column_exists FROM information_schema.columns WHERE table_name='existing_table' and column_name='new_serial_column';
IF seq_column_exists != 0 THEN RETURN; END IF;

    CREATE SEQUENCE new_seq;
    ALTER TABLE existing_table ADD COLUMN new_serial_column bigint DEFAULT 0;
    UPDATE existing_table SET new_serial_column = nextval('new_seq');
    ALTER TABLE existing_table ALTER COLUMN new_serial_column SET NOT NULL;
    ALTER TABLE existing_table ALTER COLUMN new_serial_column SET DEFAULT nextval('new_seq');
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Then, you can safely call: SELECT fixup_existing_table() to alter the schema as many times as you like, i.e. call from some dumb update script.

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