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Given this Scala function

def mv: (Int,Int,Int) = {
  (1,2,3)
}

The following works

val (i,j,k) = mv

But this does not

var i = 0
var j = 0
var k = 0
(i,j,k) = mv
<console>:1: error: ';' expected but '=' found.
   (i,j,k) = mv
           ^

This implies that assigning to multiple variables only works when they are initialized? or maybe I'm writing it incorrectly? Trying to find a way to return several values from a function and assign the values to instance variables in a Class, which means the variables can't be initialized when the function is called because they are declared outside of all methods.

class C {
  var i = 0
  var j = 0
  var k = 0
  def mv: (Int,Int,Int) = {
    (1,2,3)
  }
  def changeState: Unit = {
    (i,j,k) = mv
  }
}

The above does not work. I could create a case class to hold the return values but would like to make something this work since it seems more clear.

share|improve this question
    
Please note update following comments on initial proposal. –  elm May 11 '14 at 14:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found a way to make it work but it seems wrong minded:

class C {
  var i = 0
  var j = 0
  var k = 0
  def mv: (Int,Int,Int) = {
    (1,2,3)
  }
  def changeState: Unit = {
    val (x,y,z) = mv
    i = x
    j = y
    k = z
  }
}

val c = new C
c.i == 0 //true
c.changeState
c.i == 1 //true so this works

So it works but is ugly

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2  
This is the best solution, anyway. Scala does not support multiple assignment (ScalaReference section 6.15). See stackoverflow.com/questions/3348751/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/2776651/scala-tuple-deconstruction @user3189923 's answer is misguiding. –  MKaama May 10 '14 at 20:22
    
Yeah, too bad but true. Scala implicitly determines what to do and so hides what is really happening sometimes. That's nice usually, it leads to less verbose code, but it also can obscure problems. The multivalued return is really a hidden Tupple3[Int,Int,Int] I think. –  pferrel May 11 '14 at 23:27

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