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I'm trying to get a background image of a HTML element (body, div, etc.) to stretch its entire width and height.

Not having much luck. Is it even possible or do I have to do it some other way besides it being a background image?

My current css is:

body {
    background-position: left top;
    background-image: url(_images/home.jpg);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

Thanks in advance.

Edit: I'm not keen on maintaining the CSS in Gabriel's suggestion so I'm changing the layout of the page instead. But that seems like the best answer so I'm marking it as such.

share|improve this question
    
Of course, you could use JavaScript to do this dynamically, but that would be probably worse than the CSS hacks suggested by gabriel1836's link. –  Jason Bunting Oct 25 '08 at 4:42
    
To preserve the aspect ratio of the image you should use "background-size: cover;" or "background-size: contain;". I've built a polyfill that implements those values in IE8: github.com/louisremi/background-size-polyfill –  Louis-Rémi Dec 6 '12 at 14:32

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I did a quick google search and found this link:

http://www.htmlite.com/faq022.php

share|improve this answer
1  
Was trying to avoid stuff like this which seem more like a CSS hack. Will upvote anyway. –  Fung Oct 25 '08 at 3:56
1  
downvoted for basically a link-only answer. –  RozzA Sep 1 at 9:44
<style>

{ margin: 0; padding: 0; }

html { 
        background: url('images/yourimage.jpg') no-repeat center center fixed; 
        -webkit-background-size: cover;
        -moz-background-size: cover;
        -o-background-size: cover;
        background-size: cover;
}


</style>
share|improve this answer
    
This also works as style tags within html elements or in css files. –  Nathan Mar 16 '11 at 20:29
2  
this is the best solution, ever. –  AFD Apr 20 '12 at 10:13
1  
What's the difference between cover vs 100% 100% ? –  Pacerier May 22 '12 at 14:13
2  
100% 100% does not keep the aspect ratio of the original image. ‘cover’ scales the image, while preserving its intrinsic aspect ratio (if any), to the smallest size such that both its width and its height can completely cover the background positioning area. You can also use ‘contain’ to scale the image, while preserving its intrinsic aspect ratio (if any), to the largest size such that both its width and its height can fit inside the background positioning area. –  Mike737 Jun 22 '12 at 4:11
    
"-webkit-background-size: cover;" is not a valid CSS3 property. –  VoidKing Apr 23 '13 at 15:55

Use the background-size property: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-background/#the-background-size

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1  
Awesome, this is the correct answer. It probably doesn't work on IE, but I'm only targeting webkit for my project, so this is perfect :) –  aehlke Mar 24 '11 at 2:37

Not sure that stretching a background image is possible. If you find that it's not possible, or not reliable in all of your target browsers, you could try using a stretched img tag with z-index set lower, and position set to absolute so that other content appears on top of it.

Let us know what you end up doing.

Edit: What I suggested is basically what's in gabriel's link. So try that :)

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I saw this technique in action at least a decade ago. I can't imagine it wouldn't still work now. –  eyelidlessness Oct 25 '08 at 3:51

To expand on @PhiLho answer, you can center a very large image (or any size image) on a page with:

{ 
background-image: url(_images/home.jpg);
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-position:center; 
}

Or you could use a smaller image with a background color that matches the background of the image (if it is a solid color). This may or may not suit your purposes.

{ 
background-color: green;
background-image: url(_images/home.jpg);
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-position:center; 
}
share|improve this answer

In short you can try this....

<div data-role="page" style="background:url('backgrnd.png'); background-repeat: no-repeat; background-size: 100% 100%;" >

Where I have used few css and js...

<link rel="stylesheet" href="css/jquery.mobile-1.0.1.min.css" />
<script src="js/jquery-1.7.1.min.js"></script>
<script src="js/jquery.mobile-1.0.1.min.js"></script>

And it is working fine for me.

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You cannot in pure CSS. Having an image covering the whole page behind all other components is probably your best bet (looks like that's the solution given above). Anyway, chances are it will look awful anyway. I would try either an image big enough to cover most screen resolutions (say up to 1600x1200, above it is scarcer), to limit the width of the page, or just to use an image that tile.

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background: url(images/bg.jpg) no-repeat center center fixed; 
-webkit-background-size: cover;
-moz-background-size: cover;
-o-background-size: cover;
background-size: cover;
share|improve this answer

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