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Say I have 2 processes, ProcessA and ProcessB. If I perform int fd=open(somefile) in ProcessA, can I then pass the value of file descriptor fd over IPC to ProcessB and have it manipulate the same file?

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1  
See this question. – bmargulies Mar 1 '10 at 20:10
1  
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1997622 – Zitrax Mar 1 '10 at 22:21
up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can pass a file descriptor to another process over unix domain sockets. Here's the code to pass such a file descriptor, taken from Unix Network Programming

ssize_t
write_fd(int fd, void *ptr, size_t nbytes, int sendfd)
{
    struct msghdr   msg;
    struct iovec    iov[1];

#ifdef  HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    union {
      struct cmsghdr    cm;
      char              control[CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int))];
    } control_un;
    struct cmsghdr  *cmptr;

    msg.msg_control = control_un.control;
    msg.msg_controllen = sizeof(control_un.control);

    cmptr = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&msg);
    cmptr->cmsg_len = CMSG_LEN(sizeof(int));
    cmptr->cmsg_level = SOL_SOCKET;
    cmptr->cmsg_type = SCM_RIGHTS;
    *((int *) CMSG_DATA(cmptr)) = sendfd;
#else
    msg.msg_accrights = (caddr_t) &sendfd;
    msg.msg_accrightslen = sizeof(int);
#endif

    msg.msg_name = NULL;
    msg.msg_namelen = 0;

    iov[0].iov_base = ptr;
    iov[0].iov_len = nbytes;
    msg.msg_iov = iov;
    msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

    return(sendmsg(fd, &msg, 0));
}
/* end write_fd */

And here's the code to receive the file descriptor

ssize_t
read_fd(int fd, void *ptr, size_t nbytes, int *recvfd)
{
    struct msghdr   msg;
    struct iovec    iov[1];
    ssize_t         n;
    int             newfd;

#ifdef  HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    union {
      struct cmsghdr    cm;
      char              control[CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int))];
    } control_un;
    struct cmsghdr  *cmptr;

    msg.msg_control = control_un.control;
    msg.msg_controllen = sizeof(control_un.control);
#else
    msg.msg_accrights = (caddr_t) &newfd;
    msg.msg_accrightslen = sizeof(int);
#endif

    msg.msg_name = NULL;
    msg.msg_namelen = 0;

    iov[0].iov_base = ptr;
    iov[0].iov_len = nbytes;
    msg.msg_iov = iov;
    msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

    if ( (n = recvmsg(fd, &msg, 0)) <= 0)
        return(n);

#ifdef  HAVE_MSGHDR_MSG_CONTROL
    if ( (cmptr = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&msg)) != NULL &&
        cmptr->cmsg_len == CMSG_LEN(sizeof(int))) {
        if (cmptr->cmsg_level != SOL_SOCKET)
            err_quit("control level != SOL_SOCKET");
        if (cmptr->cmsg_type != SCM_RIGHTS)
            err_quit("control type != SCM_RIGHTS");
        *recvfd = *((int *) CMSG_DATA(cmptr));
    } else
        *recvfd = -1;       /* descriptor was not passed */
#else
/* *INDENT-OFF* */
    if (msg.msg_accrightslen == sizeof(int))
        *recvfd = newfd;
    else
        *recvfd = -1;       /* descriptor was not passed */
/* *INDENT-ON* */
#endif

    return(n);
}
/* end read_fd */
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9  
Note though that the actual numerical value of the file descriptor will in general be different in the two processes. – caf Mar 1 '10 at 21:31
1  
You can pass the number this way. That doesn't magically mean it will work as a file descriptor to the same file at both ends. – EJP May 12 '14 at 8:50
1  
@EJP The idea with SCM_RIGHTS is that it will. Though none comes to mind, I'm sure there are some caveats. (i.e., the concept works pretty much like dup(), but between unrelated processes) – nos May 12 '14 at 10:12

You can use the method nos described in this thread, or the (more conventional) way, by sharing it between related processes (typically parent-child or siblings) by having it created, the forked processes automatically receive a copy.

Indeed, forked processes get all your FDs and can use them unless they close them (which is generally a good idea).

Therefore if a parent forks two children, if they both have a file descriptor they didn't close, it is now shared (even if the parent subsequently closes it). This could, for example, be a pipe from one child to another. This is how shell redirects like

ls -l | more

Work.

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Note that in the example of above, the setting of variables when receiving, like:

msg.msg_name = NULL;
msg.msg_namelen = 0;

iov[0].iov_base = ptr;
iov[0].iov_len = nbytes;
msg.msg_iov = iov;
msg.msg_iovlen = 1;

is not required. The whole idea of a message structure with headers is that the receiving site does not have to know what it reads, and can by checking the (first) header, what kind of message it is and what to expect.

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