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I created a class with a constructor that takes an int to determine the size of a linked list the object has. The problem I'm having is I need to be able to call this constructor when this object is instantiated as a private member of another class. So basically:

class A {
public:
    A();
    A(int size);
};

class B {
    const int size = // any number > 0
private:
    A a(size);
};

I get this error:

constant "B::size" is not a type name

I've tried searching online, but I can't come across this specific issue. It could be that I'm struggling to word the question correctly... it's a weird issue I haven't seen yet. Any help is appreciated!

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You have declared methods but you have not implemented them. Where's the implementation? – merlin2011 May 11 '14 at 8:46
    
That's a faulty design. I suggest you ask about the actual problem you are trying to solve, and not about the solution you had in mind. – StoryTeller May 11 '14 at 8:47
    
The constructor for A should be called in the constructor for B. You can't instantiate directly in a header file unless you are using a constant. – donutmonger May 11 '14 at 8:48
    
Your declaration of A a(size); is wrong, should be A a; and initialize the a member in class B's constructor member initialization list. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 11 '14 at 8:48
    
Thanks donutmonger and πάντα ῥεῖ! – user3625087 May 11 '14 at 8:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot call the constructor with parameters in the member variable declaration.

You can implement a constructor for B and do it there.

B::B() : a(size) {}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That's exactly what I was looking for. I have no idea why I didn't try that... – user3625087 May 11 '14 at 8:56

You have to do in the B constructor, using an initializer list:

class B
{
public:
    B() : a(size)
    {}

private:
    A a;
    const int size = ...;
};
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