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I am trying to create a list with C language and I met with a bugWhen I run the program and enter a number, the program would stop.

enter image description here

I can't find a solution.

#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdio.h>
struct list
{
    int data;
    struct list *next;
};
typedef struct list node;
typedef node *link;
int main(void)
{
    link ptr,head;
    int num,i;
    ptr=(link)malloc(sizeof(node));
    ptr=head;
    printf("Please input 5 numbers==>\n");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
    scanf("%d",&num);
    ptr->data=num;
    ptr->next=malloc(sizeof(node));
    if(i==4)  
        ptr->next=NULL;
    else 
        ptr=ptr->next;
    }
    ptr=head;
    while(ptr!=NULL)
    {
    printf("The value is ==> %d\n",ptr->data);
    ptr=ptr->next;
    }
    return 0;
}
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closed as off-topic by Hobo Sapiens, Kerrek SB, jaypal singh, underscore, Kedarnath May 12 at 3:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Hobo Sapiens, Kerrek SB, jaypal singh, underscore, Kedarnath
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Removing C++ label, as this has no C++ code at all. –  Mats Petersson May 11 at 16:19
1  
ptr = head probably should be head = ptr? –  Mats Petersson May 11 at 16:20
2  
What happened after you pressed "debug"? –  alk May 11 at 16:21
1  
Why down vote this... ? it has code an error message and everything. Is SO only usable by experts? –  ojblass May 11 at 16:22
1  
@ojblass: SO isn't a debugging service. This question does not show any evidence of the user having tried to debug/analyse this issue on his/her own. The questions as it stands is of help for no-one, as no-one will have a look at it and its answers. No tags, no title, no thoughts, nothing .... –  alk May 11 at 16:26

4 Answers 4

ptr=(link)malloc(sizeof(node));
ptr=head;

After the assign you throw away the address of the allocated memory

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ptr=(link)malloc(sizeof(node));
ptr=head;

The second assignment voids the first. And head is undefined.

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link ptr,head;
ptr=(link)malloc(sizeof(node));
ptr=head;

With the second assignment you've thrown away the pointer to allocated memory and replaced it with an undefined value. That first assignment should be to head, not ptr.

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Just remove head and every line that contains it. Your code will be fine.

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No, that's not right - then it will only print the LAST element in the list. –  Mats Petersson May 11 at 16:25
    
head is defined but never assigned. Although it's used several times. That's his problem. This will solve his current problem which led him to StackOverflow. "You code will be fine" means your bug you were talking about will be fixed. It doesn't mean that his code will be without bug and will work perfectly. –  Mustafa Chelik May 11 at 16:31
    
Surely answers here should not "remove the problem", but also "fix the problem". Otherwise, we'd end up with every program being int main() { return 0; } - that's completely bug free, but probably doesn't actually solve what you wanted to do. –  Mats Petersson May 11 at 16:33
    
However, like my comment says, setting head = ptr instead of the other way around, should fix most of the problems with this code - it's perhape not perfect, but closer. –  Mats Petersson May 11 at 16:35

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