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I'm working on an abstract class where the implementing class needs to implement a list of T. The problem is that this doesn't work:

public class AbstractClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass
{
    public List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}

I'm sure that there is an obvious answer that I'm missing, and I know that I can build an abstract base type to put in the list, but when I use my Linq command to build the list, the abstract type (ItemBase) doesn't play nicely with the .ToList() method. Is what I'm trying to do so unique?

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It turns out that I need to learn to research better. Apologies to all of the answers that were the same that didn't get the check mark. I chose the top one based off of it's completeness and the fact it was top. –  thaBadDawg Mar 1 '10 at 22:31
    
Do you actually want Items to be abstract? (ie to override the get or set properties?) If you extend from AbstractClass<Widgets> like most people are suggesting, Container.Items will implicitly be a List<Widgets>, and you won't even need to override it. –  Tanzelax Mar 1 '10 at 22:39
    
I want to leave the possibility of the getter and setter methods being overridden later on. In theory I don't need to, but in practice trying to undo that mess leads to a world of hurt. –  thaBadDawg Mar 1 '10 at 23:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need the declaration on the class as well, to know what type T is:

public abstract class AbstractClass<T>
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widgets>
{
    public List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}

You can also restrict what T can be, like say it must implement IWidgets:

public class AbstractClass<T> where T : IWidgets
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1  
Don't forget to add the abstract key word in the class declaration line itself, not just the property. –  Nick Mar 1 '10 at 22:30
1  
This doesn't compile. –  Mark Byers Mar 1 '10 at 22:31
  • You need to declare the type T.
  • You need to declare the class AbstractClass as abstract.
  • You need to use the override keyword.

Try this:

public class Widgets { }

public abstract class AbstractClass<T>
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widgets>
{
    public override List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}
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+1 for compiling code –  Tanzelax Mar 1 '10 at 22:37

You need to make AbstractClass generic

public class AbstractClass<T> {
  ...
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widgets> { ...
}
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  1. You need to mark AbstractClass abstract, because it contains abstract property

  2. Specify the generic type in the AbstractClass declaration

  3. Implement abstract property with override


public abstract class AbstractClass<T>
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widgets>
{
    public override List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}

share|improve this answer

You need to specify the type in the abstract class:

public class AbstractClass<T>
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widgets>
{
    public List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

You need to define T like so

public class AbstractClass<T>
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }

    public abstract List<T> Items { get; set; }
}

public class Container : AbstractClass<Widget>
{
    public List<Widgets> Items { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

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