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Attempting to create a Joda-Money Money object from a BigDecimal read from a MySQL database throws an error.

This code:

PreparedStatement p_stmt = ...;
ResultSet results = ...;
Money amount = Money.of(CurrencyUnit.USD, results.getBigDecimal("amount"));

Throws this:

java.lang.ArithmeticException: Scale of amount 1.0000 is greater than the scale of the currency USD
    at org.joda.money.Money.of(Money.java:74)
    at core.DB.getMoney(DB.java:4821)

I have actually solved the error by adding rounding:

Money amount = Money.of(CurrencyUnit.USD, results.getBigDecimal("amount"), RoundingMode.HALF_UP);

But, I am leery of this solution. Is it the best?.

I am using DECIMAL(19,4) to store the money values on the DB as per this SO answer. Honestly, it kind of confused me why the answerer there called for 4 decimal place precision on the DB, but I tend to trust high-valued answers and I assume they know what they're talking about and that I'll regret not following their advice. Yet Joda-Time does not like 4 decimal place precision with US Currency. Maybe DECIMAL(19,4) was an international standard where they need 4 decimal place precision? Not sure..

To make the questions succinct:

  1. Is RoundingMode.HALF_UP the ideal solution to solve this error?
  2. Should I change the precision on the MySQL DB from DECIMAL(19,4) to DECIMAL(19,2)?
  3. Is there a way to change the precision in Joda-Money? If yes: should I?
share|improve this question

Yes, not a good solution. You are representing money, thus u cannot round up/down and loose a few cents :).

The problem is that the CurrencyUnit.USD has the number of digits to 2, e.g: 1.45 and what comes from the DB is something like 1.45343, perhaps, resulting in a difference in scale. Try to represent the money with BigMoney instead of Money.

BigMoney amount = BigMoney .of(CurrencyUnit.USD, results.getBigDecimal("amount"));
share|improve this answer
    
Well, you wouldn't lose cents. You'd close fractions of cents, because it would round the BigDecimal HALF_UP to the scale of the Money object, so you'd only be losing a fraction of a cent. – ryvantage May 30 '14 at 19:41

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