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I have a NSDictionary containing a few different objects, among which is a NSArray.

Elements in the array are NSDictionary-representations of a custom object. I have renamed the properties and removed some others for simplicity.

First I try to simply serialize the NSArray like this, just to see what it would look like:

NSData *jsonData = [NSJSONSerialization dataWithJSONObject:myArray options:NSJSONWritingPrettyPrinted error:&writeError];
NSLog(@"%@", [[NSString alloc] initWithData:jsonData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]);

The result looks like this, which is what I expected:

[
  {
    "someProperty" : "Value 1"
  },
  {
    "someProperty" : "Value 2"
  }
]

However, when I add the (unencoded) array to a NSDictionary and serialize that in stead the array looks different:

NSMutableArray *myArray = [NSMutableArray array];
[myArray addObject:[object1 dictionaryRepresentation]]; // dictionaryRepresentation returns a NSDictionary
[myArray addObject:[object2 dictionaryRepresentation]];

NSMutableDictionary *dictionary = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
[dictionary setObject:myArray forKey:@"myArray"];
NSData *jsonData = [NSJSONSerialization dataWithJSONObject:dictionary options:NSJSONWritingPrettyPrinted error:&writeError];
NSLog(@"%@", [[NSString alloc] initWithData:jsonData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]);

Now the result looks like this:

{
  myArray =     (
                  {
            "someProperty" : "Value 1"
        },
                  {
            "someProperty" : "Value 2"
        }
  );
}

In stead of getting "myArray" : [...] I get myArray = (...); which is not the proper JSON representation.

What is the correct way of making it use the JSON representation of the NSArray when adding it to the dictionary?

share|improve this question
    
The best (though not perfect) explanation for your screwy "Now" result is that you took the encoded JSON from the first dictionary, converted to NSString, and then added that to the second dictionary. This is not how it should be done. You should add the first dictionary itself, not its JSON representation, to the second dictionary. Everything should be JSON-encoded at the same time, with a single operation. –  Hot Licks May 12 at 11:41
    
(It would kinda help if you showed us the code doing the encoding, including the NSLog statements producing the above output.) –  Hot Licks May 12 at 11:44
    
I believe that I understand the confusion now. It may have looked like I was taking the encoded representation of the NSArray (from the first code snippet) and adding it to my NSDictionary (in the second code snippet). In fact, the two code snippets are not being used together at all. As I explained in my question I only used the code in the first snippet to test what the serialization of an NSArray would look like. I have now provided additional lines of code to explain what it is that I am actually doing with the array. I apologize for the inclarity. –  NobleK May 12 at 12:55
    
The point is that your final "JSON" listing above is not valid JSON, nor is it what one would see on NSLogging an NSDictionary that represents valid JSON. Note that "myArray" is not quoted, and is followed by =, consistent with NSLog of a dictionary, while "someProperty" is quoted and is followed by :, consistent with JSON. You're not showing us the real data. –  Hot Licks May 12 at 15:16
    
(A JSON "object" contains quoted key values and separates key from value with :. An NSLog of an NSDictionary only quotes key values if they contain non-alpha characters, and separates key from value with =. Also, a JSON "object' is "bracketed" by [], while an NSLog of a dictionary brackets the dictionary with ().) –  Hot Licks May 12 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the first case, you are printing out the result of the JSON encoding operation.

In the second case, you are printing out the dictionary directly via NSLog and not its JSON representation.

Update:

To see this, use this logging function instead of NSLog:

void logThisObject(id obj)
{
    if(obj == nil) {
        NSLog(@"logObject: nil");
    } else {
        NSString *className = NSStringFromClass([obj class]);
        NSLog(@"logObject: an %@: %@", className, obj);
    }
}

Update 2:

void test_it()
{
    NSArray *myArray = @[@"bla", @"foo"];
    NSError *writeError = nil;

    NSMutableDictionary *dictionary = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
    [dictionary setObject:myArray forKey:@"myArray"];
    NSData *jsonData = [NSJSONSerialization dataWithJSONObject:dictionary options:NSJSONWritingPrettyPrinted error:&writeError];
    if(writeError) {
        NSLog(@"an error happened: %@", writeError);
    }
    logThisObject([[NSString alloc] initWithData:jsonData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]);
}

this outputs proper JSON string:

logObject: an __NSCFString: {
  "myArray" : [
    "bla",
    "foo"
  ]
}
share|improve this answer
    
The second case is not exactly what you'd see from an NSLog of a dictionary/array, but I presume that the OP simply approximated the appearance of the results in that case. The actual output would have = instead of : and would have no quotes around strings that did not contain any whitespace or non-alpha characters. –  Hot Licks May 11 at 22:38
    
@HotLicks The second case is what I get from the code that I included. Elements in myArray are NSDictionary-representations of a custom object. I did however rename the properties and remove some others for simplicity. –  NobleK May 12 at 6:19
    
@Michael What I am printing in the second case is the endoded JSON for the dictionary (convertet to a NSString of course). However, when I am adding the NSArray to a NSDictionary I assume it is using the same representation of the array which is used by NSLog so the result would look the same. What I need to know is the correct way of making it use the JSON representation of the NSArray when adding it to the dictionary. –  NobleK May 12 at 6:25
    
@NobleK: I updated my answer. It seems like you are JSON encoding a dictionary, throw away the result, and then print out the unencoded dictionary. Maybe you can reproduce the problem with one independent piece of code that I can copy-paste into Xcode? –  Michael May 12 at 8:50
1  
Reviewing my code again today I have detected that you were in fact correct, since among my large amount of console logging I was actually looking at the wrong output. What I provided in the question (and what caused me to believe that there was an issue) did in fact come from a direct output of the NSDictionary rather then the JSON representation. I thank you for your help and apologize for my stubbornness. –  NobleK May 12 at 20:04

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