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I have a program that requires much memory, like 2/3 of all the physical ram. After some runtime my operating system begins to swap the program to hdd. But I need the program to respond very fast all the time, so I need to prevent paging for that process.

How can you prevent the OS to swap one process?

Thanks for any help!

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Part of the point of accepting an answer is you don't have to repeat the solution in the question. –  Roger Pate Mar 2 '10 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

At the start of the program, call:

mlockall(MCL_CURRENT | MCL_FUTURE);

(If you do not have the source to the program, you'll have to debauch the process with ptrace to do this).

Be aware that this will increase the chances of memory allocations made by the process failing.

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I don't think that you can "debauch" the process. Not unless you have access to the technology from Tron. :) –  Zan Lynx Mar 2 '10 at 0:53
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"debauch"ing a process means to get it drunk, party with it, etc... :) –  dicroce Mar 2 '10 at 0:54
    
I think that's a fair metaphor :) –  caf Mar 2 '10 at 1:02

Well, there's mlock for locking memory (telling the kernel it may not be swapped out), but that's meant for relatively small amounts of memory, and would require modification of the program.

The other option might be to adjust Linux's "swappiness", i.e. its tendency to swap out pages. See here for an interesting discussion. That is not possible per process, however.

I'm not aware of any per-process solution for your problem.

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Use mmap() instead of malloc, and use the "MAP_LOCKED" flag. (works on linux > 2.5.37)

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Note that this will have the same effect (with respect to swapping) as using mlock; so the same caveats apply. –  sleske Mar 2 '10 at 0:25
    
Here's a link to a discussion @ kerneltrap regarding this technique: kerneltrap.org/node/7878 –  dicroce Mar 2 '10 at 0:28

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