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I'm trying to create a new class by subclassing another generic class (with a bound) and implementing a generic interface (without a bound):

public class Foo1<T extends Bar> {
    ...
}

public interface Foo2<T> {
    ...
}

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> 
        extends Foo1<T extends Bar> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}

This gives me compile errors. I also tried:

public class ProblemClass<T, U> 
        extends Foo1<T extends Bar> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> 
        extends Foo1<T> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}

But neither of these work either.

What's the correct syntax to define my subclass in a way that lets me keep the typing generic, letting me pass they types along to the superclass and interface? Is this even possible?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Compiler errors? –  Steven Schlansker Mar 2 '10 at 0:28
2  
I'd be interested in the use case. –  Preet Sangha Mar 2 '10 at 0:32
1  
Do you mean for ProblemClass to have the same type for both T? This would be necessary if you have "matching" methods in Foo1 and Foo2. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 2 '10 at 0:39
    
Tom, No, they will be discrete types, the class I'm extending and interface I'm implementing are used for different purposes. –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:12
    
Interestingly, I was unable to reproduce the error by simplifying the code as suggested by ahmadabdolkader. If I do this, it compiles fine. I'm now wondering if IDEA is being cranky about something further up the inheritance chain, though I can't imagine why it would. –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:16

4 Answers 4

This declaration should work fine. What error do you get? What compiler are you using?

class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U>
  extends Foo1<T>
  implements Foo2<U>
{
  ...
}

This is valid Java. If IDEA's compiler rejects it, IntelliJ has a bug.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using IntelliJ IDEA 9, the error in this case is: Type parameter 'T' is not within it's bound; should implement Bar –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:09
    
+1 for the first Idea bug hint –  Arne Burmeister Mar 2 '10 at 7:20

From the code you posted, you only have class Foo not Foo1. Is that the reason? or just posting-edit error?

I think this should work

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> 
        extends Foo1<T> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I must have accidentally changed Foo1 to Foo when I edited the question for formatting. The original question contained Foo1. –  William Brendel Mar 2 '10 at 0:35
    
I just tested this and it compiled for me. @Pinkerton, if this doesn't compile for you, please post the error message. –  Joe Carnahan Mar 2 '10 at 0:40
    
@Joe The error I'm seeing (in IntelliJ IDEA 9) is: Type parameter 'T' is not within its bound; should implement 'Bar' –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:13

This gives no compile errors with JDK 1.6.0_07

public class Bar {}

public class Foo1<T extends Bar> {}

public interface Foo2<T> {}

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> extends Foo1<T> implements Foo2<U> {}
share|improve this answer
    
For some reason, IntelliJ IDEA 9 is complaining with: Type parameter 'T' is not within its bound; should implement 'Bar' –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:10

This (from your question):

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> 
        extends Foo1<T extends Bar> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}

should be this:

public class ProblemClass<T extends Bar, U> 
        extends Foo1<T> implements Foo2<U> {
    ...
}

That is, you should not restate the bounds when extending Foo1.

With that correction the code compiles fine in javac. If IntelliJ IDEA still refuses to compile it then you may have found a bug, or perhaps the "Bar" you're referring to in Foo.java is not the same "Bar" in ProblemClass.java?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I'm thinking I may have found a bug in IDEA. The simplified cases I've tried out work just fine with the syntax you've proposed. –  Pinkerton Mar 2 '10 at 1:28

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