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I was trying to understand the working of switch in C, and after browsing through some of the answers on SO, I fumbled upon the following piece of answer on SO :-

Basically, a switch acts like a goto to the appropriate label -- intervening statements aren't executed. Variable definitions (which actually happen at compile time) do happen, but if they contain initialization, that's skipped too.

How does switch statement work?

Can anybody please explain the meaning of this statement or provide some more insight into the working of switch.
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closed as unclear what you're asking by ruakh, shree.pat18, Arion, M42, Avanz May 12 at 7:44

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What specifically are you having difficulties with from the link you posted? The accepted answer along with the statement you have highlighted seem clear enough. –  shree.pat18 May 12 at 5:40
    
Are you looking for an explanation of how to use it? For an explanation how it's implemented internally? For philosophical ruminations on its similarity to goto statements? –  ruakh May 12 at 5:40
    
I am not able to understand how this particular answers that problem in the link. –  ps06756 May 12 at 5:41
    
A code example could be really useful to demonstrate the truth of this statement. –  ps06756 May 12 at 5:42
    
@ps06756, There are code examples in the other answers to the post that you linked. –  merlin2011 May 12 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is an example of a switch statement, directly copied from this answer.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    int expr = 1;
    switch (expr)
    {
        int i = 4;
        f(i);
        case 0:
        i = 17;
        /* falls through into default code */
        default:
        printf("%d\n", i);
    }
}

Here is an equivalent code sample, written with goto.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    int expr = 1;
    if (expr == 0) goto label0;
    else goto label1;

    int i = 4;
    f(i);
    label0:
    i = 17;

    label1:
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

Observe that, in both cases, when expr is initialized to 1, the initialization statement int i = 4 is not executed, so i is not initialized. However, i is defined, just as the quote in the question mentions.

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Without switch:

  if(1 == x)
     goto LABEL_A;
  else if(2 == x)
     goto LABEL_B;
  else if(10 == x)
     goto LABEL_C;
  else
     goto LABEL_D;

LABEL_A:
  /* Do A */;
  goto BREAK;

LABEL_B:
  /* Do B */;
  goto BREAK;

LABEL_C:
  /* Do C */;
  goto BREAK;

LABEL_D:
  /* Do D */;
  goto BREAK;

BREAK:

With switch:

switch(x)
  {
  case 1:
     /* Do A */;
     break;

  case 2:
     /* Do B */;
     break;

  case 10:
     /* Do C */;
     break;

  default:
     /* Do D */;
     break;
  }
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