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For this program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var state = States.One;
        switch (state)
        {
            case States.One:
                Console.WriteLine("One");
                break;
            case States.Zero:
                goto case States.One;
        }
    }
}

public enum States : ulong
{
    Zero = 0,
    One = 1,
}

I got:

"A switch expression or case label must be a bool, char, string, integral, enum, or corresponding nullable type"

But state variable is enum type. The error disappears if I comment the goto case line.

I am using VS 2013. + .NET 4.5.1.

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30  
Please, don't use goto it is considered a bad-practice –  Max May 12 '14 at 8:54
22  
@MaxMommersteeg sometimes it is usefull and clear to not creates tens of voids for switch –  Brans Ds May 12 '14 at 9:01
17  
@MaxMommersteeg. It appears the OP is attempting to create a switch fall-thru which has to be done using the goto statement in C#. In C/C++ you don't need the goto for a fall-thru. Also, consider why "goto considered harmful" in the first place - it's because it can lead to spagetti code in un structured code. –  user2425056 May 12 '14 at 9:11
6  
@MaxMommersteeg: goto within switch is only mentioned in the end of that article. It refers to a separate article about goto in switch on the same site, which starts with the explanation "Goto is used inside switch. This can enhance performance and reduce code size in some cases." (emphasis by myself) –  O. R. Mapper May 12 '14 at 9:26
6  
I think that goto case is probably the most-likely-to-be-valid usage of goto that exists in C#. –  Tim S. May 12 '14 at 16:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 64 down vote accepted

This is known bug of the C# compiler when enum is typed as ulong and you use goto case at the same time. If you remove the ulong from enum, it compiles just fine. And because not many people run into this problem, they are not focusing on fixing it.

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It works fine with any other integral type, signed or unsigned, so I'd say it's a bug, too. –  Rik May 12 '14 at 9:03
    
It's documented as a bug, indeed. –  Matthew Watson May 12 '14 at 9:05
    
But you can leave ulong and just use the value in the goto with something like 'goto case 1, 'goto case 0 ... and you will see a warning The 'goto case' value is not implicitly convertible to type 'States' –  blacai May 12 '14 at 9:06
    
@blacai Well, that can't handle values more than int.MaxValue. If that's not the problem we can go for it. –  Sriram Sakthivel May 12 '14 at 9:07
36  
For the record: it has been fixed in Rosyln, so the last sentence is perhaps unfair. –  Marc Gravell May 12 '14 at 9:09

Depending on your use case, this might also be an option for you:

switch (state)
{
    case States.Zero:
    case States.One:
        Console.WriteLine("One");
        break;
}

This should be working according to an example here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/06tc147t.aspx

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You could use a label for goto instead of using the case directly in the goto statement:

switch (state)
{
    case States.One:
caseZeroRedirect:
        Console.WriteLine("One");
        break;
    case States.Zero:
        CouldDoSomethingFirst();
        goto caseZeroRedirect;
}
share|improve this answer

You should try this:-

switch (state)
{
 case States.Zero:
 case States.One:
    Console.WriteLine("1");
    break;
}
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