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My project requires me to communicate with many devices outside the cloud. If successful, this means millions of devices. These devices will not be running Android or iOS, and will be running behind routers & firewalls (I cannot assume they have an external IP).

I am looking to use SQS to send messages to my users outside the cloud. To allow the servers to message individual users, I am designing the system to have one queue per client. This can potentially mean millions (billions?) of queues. While it states that SQS can support unlimited queues, I would like to make sure that I am not abusing the system. If successful, the probability of millions of users is very high.

  • I am aware that SQS can be expensive, but I am using it at this stage for ease of administration.
  • As far as I can tell SNS requires either an IOS/Android client, or an HTTP server running on the consumer. This is why I ruled out SNS, and I am using SQS.
  • I am going to build a distributed cloud front-end over SQS to handle client connections. This front-end will just be a wrapper, that will
    authenticate clients, and relay them to the SQS queues.

Am I abusing the SQS "unlimited queues" policy (will SQS performance drop)? Is there a simpler design for per device messaging?

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This problem is likely to become a LOT more common, esp as ioT becomes common. Having SQS handle each ioT traffic is very attractive value proposition, but will end up with millions/billions of queue problem like you highlighted. –  Hon Chong Chang Feb 24 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

Let me break the answer by the parts of your question:

About your questions:

Am I abusing the SQS "unlimited queues" policy?

AWS services are designed to prevent abuse and you will pay exactly for what you use, so if you believe this is the right approach, go for it. To remove the uncertainty, i'd advise for a preliminary "proof of concept" implementation.

Is there a simpler design for per device messaging?

Probably yes, re-consider SNS and other messaging systems.

About your statements:

I am aware that SQS can be expensive, but I am using it at this stage for ease of administration.

"Expensive" is a very context-depend classification, considering that a SQS message can cost $0.00000005.

As far as I can tell SNS requires either an IOS/Android client, or an HTTP server running on the consumer. This is why I ruled out SNS, and I am using SQS.

SNS is a push based messaging system (SQS is pull based) that can handle 5 types of subscriptions: smtp, sms, http, mobile push and SQS, so they are not mutually exclusive.

I am going to build a distributed cloud front-end over SQS to handle client connections. This front-end will just be a wrapper, that will authenticate clients, and relay them to the SQS queues.

Managing millions of queues can be a overwhelming task for your "distributed cloud front-end over SQS". Unless your project is exactly about queue management, this is probably undifferentiated heavy lifting.

This is about all i can say without knowing your case, but consider that you can use SNS/SQS together with each other and with other messaging software, such as Apache Camel and others, that may help you build your solution or proof of concept.

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By abusing I mean: Will SQS stop working properly (high latency, low throughput)? SNS is not exactly push for devices, as Google and Apple implement client side polling for you. (SNS just pushes it to G & A). Can I reconsider SNS for non Android embedded devices? The project is about sending messages to many devices. The frontend should be easy to scale on AWS-Beanstalk, as I am expecting SQS to do the data scaling for me. All I need to do is add more HTTP endpoints which will allow clients to poll SQS for me. –  eshalev May 13 '14 at 5:16
    
SNS does support non android devices, you can use Apple Push Notification Service (APNS), Google Cloud Messaging for Android (GCM) and Amazon Device Messaging (ADM) (see: docs.aws.amazon.com/sns/latest/dg/SNSMobilePush.html). –  Julio Faerman May 13 '14 at 12:45
    
SQS will keep working OK, but it can bee too simple for a complete application. If you need more functionality, particularly integration with event processing engines, i'd also consider AWS Kinesis... –  Julio Faerman May 13 '14 at 12:47
    
My devices are not Android/Apple/Kindle. They are other devices running embedded linux. As such if I understand correctly SNS is not an option... –  eshalev May 14 '14 at 8:12
    
I see, you are quite right then. But even so, considering that SNS topics can have SQS subscriptions. That may help the queue management part of the backend system, even if consumers pull directly from the queue. –  Julio Faerman May 15 '14 at 2:35

I think SQS (or SNS if you can eventually use them) are still your best bet, esp if you need "quick response" or "near real time"; however, for the sake of having "alternatives" just so you can compare...

  1. You can consider a giant dynamoDB, with each device/client having it's own "device-id" and perhaps "message-id" as key. This way, your devices can query it's own keys for messages. DynamoDB is meant to handle billions of rows, so this won't stress it much. The querying part, you should be careful though, as you could use up provisioned queries, although at aggregate level, your devices may not all respond/query at the same time, so you may still be ok.

  2. You can also consider having a giant S3 bucket, each folder key'ed to the device id and further keyed into message-id folders. This is a poor man's SQS but it's guaranteed to scale, both in message quantity and number of accesses to it.

In both #1 and #2, if your devices are registered with Cognito for credentials, there's a straightforward way to do policies, so the devices can only access their "own" stuff. However, both alternatives #1 and #2 is likely slower than SQS, esp if you use SQS long-poll -- in long poll, you get responses, as soon as SQS detects a message have been dropped off... These alternatives will require you to wait for next cycle-poll.

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Dynamo is eventually consistent. It works best when using small quorums for queries. However that just makes the eventual constancy worse. Thus resulting in longer delays (2 cycles). –  eshalev Feb 25 at 19:53
    
Regarding SQS. Yes, it is very attractive. I am using long polling, and the response time is great. However, will it remain great with 1 billion queues? –  eshalev Feb 25 at 19:53

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