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Since, two methods with the same parameters but different return values will not compile. What is the best way to define this interface without loosing clarity?

public interface IDuplexChannel<T, U>
{
    void Send(T value, int timeout = -1);
    void Send(U value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(U value, int timeout = -1);
    T Receive(int timeout = -1);
    U Receive(int timeout = -1);
    bool TryReceive(out T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TryReceive(out U value, int timeout = -1);
}

I considered using out params but that would make it a little awkward to use.

public interface IDuplexChannel<T, U>
{
    void Send(T value, int timeout = -1);
    void Send(U value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(U value, int timeout = -1);
    void Receive(out T value, int timeout = -1);
    void Receive(out U value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TryReceive(out T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TryReceive(out U value, int timeout = -1);
}

Generic version, a little unwieldy but it works.

public interface IDuplexChannel<T, U>
{
    void Send(T value, int timeout = -1);
    void Send(U value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TrySend(U value, int timeout = -1);
    V Receive<V>(int timeout = -1) where V : T, U;
    bool TryReceive(out T value, int timeout = -1);
    bool TryReceive(out U value, int timeout = -1);
}
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1  
Where doesn't it compile? what is the error? –  Daniel A. White Mar 2 '10 at 2:21
    
What version of C#? –  SLaks Mar 2 '10 at 2:30
    
Updated tags... –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 2:31
3  
You're going to have a heck of a time with this if anyone ever uses an <int, int> construction. –  Eric Lippert Mar 2 '10 at 3:13
1  
I'm not intending to point out anyone's stupidity. I'm merely intending to point out a potential problem that you might have with this interface design. The CLR has many problems with any type which may cause signature unification under generic construction; in the original design of C# generics it would have been illegal to even declare the type you describe. –  Eric Lippert Mar 2 '10 at 8:26
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The main problem is you are trying to view the duplex channel from both ends at the same time. Data travels both ways on a duplex channel, but there are still definite endpoints. What you send on one end is what you receive on the other.

public interface IDuplexChannel<TSend, TReceive>
{
    void Send(TSend data);
    TReceive Receive();
}

That said, you should be using WCF anyway, especially since you're using .NET 4.0.

Edit: Pictures

        "PERSON" A                                     "PERSON" B
            O            int ----------------->            O
           -|-           <-------------- string           -|-
           / \                                            / \
IDuplexChannel<int, string>                     IDuplexChannel<string, int>
share|improve this answer
    
Why would I use WCF? –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 3:32
    
Especially since I am just experimenting with inter-thread communication? –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 3:38
    
However, I do see your point about the semantics of the interface name. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 3:43
    
Even though it doesn't answer my original question it does resolve the question by pointing out the flaws in my design. Eric Lippert gets partial credit. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 4:14
1  
That's way too enterprisey for messing around with after work. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 13:35
show 6 more comments

Rename these two methods. They only differ by return type.

T Receive(int timeout = -1);
U Receive(int timeout = -1);

Note, I have not tested this. Try this.

R Receive<R>(int timeout = -1);
share|improve this answer
    
Any name suggestions? –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 2:26
    
Your second suggestion is my fallback. The reason I don't like it is that you have to specifically define the type Receive<MyLongClassName>. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 2:28
1  
If you want my 2 cents... I say get rid of the Receive methods and just use the TryReceive. Whenever given the choice of a Something or TrySomething method, I always prefer the latter. –  Josh Mar 2 '10 at 2:30
2  
@Josh - I've considered doing that, however I decided to add the non-try methods so you wouldn't have to raise the exception yourself if you have no way to handle the failure. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 2:33
1  
Why would you say that TryReceive will be more commonly used? Unless I need to explicitly handle the case where a receive fails from the same location I call it, I would generally use Receive and let exceptions bubble. You can argue for both cases, which is why both cases tend to exist in most Microsoft interfaces. Ultimately, its a context-dependent decision which one you use, and both have value. –  jrista Mar 2 '10 at 3:03
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The problem is indeed that there are two Receive methods that differ only by the return type. Because your type represents a duplex channel, you had to duplicate everything in the interface - I believe a simpler approach would be to define a type that allows you to represent "either T or U" value. This is quite related to Tuple<T, U>, which is now in .NET that allows you to represent "both T and U". The signature of the type could look like this:

// Represents either a value of type T or a value of type U
class Either<T, U> { 
  public bool TryGetFirst(out T val);
  public bool TryGetSecond(out U val);
}

// For constructing values of type Either<T, U>
static class Either {
  public static Either<T, U> First<T, U>(T val);
  public static Either<T, U> Second<T, U>(U val);
}

A sample usage of this class might look like this:

var val = Either.First<int, string>(42);

int num;
string str;
if (val.TryGetFirst(out num)) 
  Console.WriteLine("Got number: {0}", num);
else if (val.TryGetSecond(out str)) 
  Console.WriteLine("Got string: {0}", str);

Then you can represent your duplex channel using a simpler interface:

public interface IDuplexChannel<T, U> { 
    void Send(Either<T, U> value, int timeout = -1); 
    bool TrySend(Either<T, U> value, int timeout = -1); 
    Either<T, U> Receive(int timeout = -1); 
    bool TryReceive(out Either<T, U> value, int timeout = -1); 
} 

As Josh suggest, I would also get rid of the Receive and Send methods. Why? Because it makes implementing the interface simple and you can easily provide an implementation of Receive and Send in terms of TryReceive and TrySend as an extension method. So, you end up with an interface:

public interface IDuplexChannel<T, U> { 
    bool TrySend(Either<T, U> value, int timeout = -1); 
    bool TryReceive(out Either<T, U> value, int timeout = -1); 
} 

And the extension methods would look roughly like this:

public static Either<T, U> Receive
    (this IDuplexChannel<T, U> ch, int timeout = -1) {
  Either<T, U> v;
  if (!ch.TryReceive(out v, timeout)) throw new Exception(...);
  return v;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a fantastic idea. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 3:16
    
@ChaosPandion: Tomas is correct about the simplicity of only using one version of Send and Receive in the interface. This answer is also interesting to review. But it's a fantastically terrible idea to actually implement. You'd be using generics to indicate what you can send on your channels, followed by massive workarounds to prevent the compiler from enforcing it... what's the point? –  280Z28 Mar 2 '10 at 3:27
    
I was assuming that the original inteface declaration is what the author of the question actually needs. If it is better design the type differently (to support just receiving values of one type and sending values of the other type), then this is of course too complicated. –  Tomas Petricek Mar 2 '10 at 9:40
    
@280Z28 - If I were keeping my original design this is what I would have used. –  ChaosPandion Mar 2 '10 at 14:10
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