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Will the following append() in the catch cause the rethrown exception to see the effect of append() being called?

try {
  mayThrowMyErr();
} catch (myErr &err) {
  err.append("Add to my message here");
  throw; // Does the rethrow exception reflect the call to append()?
}

Similarly, if I rewrite it this way, will bit slicing occur if the actual exception is derived by myErr?

try {
  mayThrowObjectDerivedFromMyErr();
} catch (myErr &err) {
  err.append("Add to my message's base class here");
  throw err; // Do I lose the derived class exception and only get myErr?
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 64 down vote accepted

In both cases, since you catch by reference, you are effectively altering the state of the original exception object (which you can think of as residing in a magical memory location which will stay valid during the subsequent unwinding -- 0x98e7058 in the example below). However,

  1. In the first case, since you rethrow with throw; (which, unlike throw err;, preserves the original exception object, with your modifications, in said "magical location" at 0x98e7058) will reflect the call to append()
  2. In the second case, since you throw something explicitly, a copy of err will be created then thrown anew (at a different "magical location" 0x98e70b0 -- because for all the compiler knows err could be an object on the stack about to be unwinded, like e was at 0xbfbce430, not in the "magical location" at 0x98e7058), so you will lose derived-class-specific data during the copy-construction of a base class instance.

Simple program to illustrate what's happening:

#include <stdio.h>

struct MyErr {
  MyErr() {
    printf("  Base default constructor, this=%p\n", this);
  }
  MyErr(const MyErr& other) {
    printf("  Base copy-constructor, this=%p from that=%p\n", this, &other);
  }
  virtual ~MyErr() {
    printf("  Base destructor, this=%p\n", this);
  }
};

struct MyErrDerived : public MyErr {
  MyErrDerived() {
    printf("  Derived default constructor, this=%p\n", this);
  }
  MyErrDerived(const MyErrDerived& other) {
    printf("  Derived copy-constructor, this=%p from that=%p\n", this, &other);
  }
  virtual ~MyErrDerived() {
    printf("  Derived destructor, this=%p\n", this);
  }
};

int main() {
  try {
    try {
      MyErrDerived e;
      throw e;
    } catch (MyErr& err) {
      printf("A Inner catch, &err=%p\n", &err);
      throw;
    }
  } catch (MyErr& err) {
    printf("A Outer catch, &err=%p\n", &err);
  }
  printf("---\n");
  try {
    try {
      MyErrDerived e;
      throw e;
    } catch (MyErr& err) {
      printf("B Inner catch, &err=%p\n", &err);
      throw err;
    }
  } catch (MyErr& err) {
    printf("B Outer catch, &err=%p\n", &err);
  }
  return 0;
}

Result:

  Base default constructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Derived default constructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Base default constructor, this=0x98e7058
  Derived copy-constructor, this=0x98e7058 from that=0xbfbce430
  Derived destructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Base destructor, this=0xbfbce430
A Inner catch, &err=0x98e7058
A Outer catch, &err=0x98e7058
  Derived destructor, this=0x98e7058
  Base destructor, this=0x98e7058
---
  Base default constructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Derived default constructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Base default constructor, this=0x98e7058
  Derived copy-constructor, this=0x98e7058 from that=0xbfbce430
  Derived destructor, this=0xbfbce430
  Base destructor, this=0xbfbce430
B Inner catch, &err=0x98e7058
  Base copy-constructor, this=0x98e70b0 from that=0x98e7058
  Derived destructor, this=0x98e7058
  Base destructor, this=0x98e7058
B Outer catch, &err=0x98e70b0
  Base destructor, this=0x98e70b0

Also see:

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Yes, rethrowing rethrows the original exception object, which you have modified by a reference. You can also catch a base class reference, modify by it and still be able to rethrow the original derived exception type by throw;.

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for first question, yes.

but for second, refer to Vlad answer. you will need to carefully design your exception object to handle copy ctor. by convention, base class doesn't recognize its child so you will most likely lose the additional data carried by derived class.

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I'll just toss in here that Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 will rethrow the original exception in the "throw err" case.

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