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I have an ArrayList which contains fixed type of objects. However everytime I need to extract an object a particular index, I need to typecast it to my user defined type from object type.

Is there a way in C# to declare ArrayList of fixed types just like Java and C++, or is there a work around to avoid the typecasting everytime?

Edit:

I apologize I forgot mentioning that I require the datastructure to be thread-safe, which List is not. Otherwise I would have just used a normal Array. But I want to save myself from the effort of explicitly locking and unlocking while writing the array.

So I thought of using ArrayList, synchronize it, but it requires typecasting every time.

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I miss the time before learning about List<T> . It caused me to rewrite almost everything I had previously peppered with arraylist's. –  Dested Mar 2 '10 at 3:50
1  
Have you considered or read this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/573ths2x.aspx –  Will Marcouiller Mar 2 '10 at 3:54

7 Answers 7

Take a look at System.Collections.Generic.List

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx

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i am sorry i forgot mentioning that i need the data structure to be threadsafe –  Kazoom Mar 2 '10 at 3:47

You could use a List. The List class takes advantage of generics to make a strongly typed collection.

To use, just call new List< Type you want to use >() like this:

List<string> myStringList = new List<string>();

MSDN has a quick article on some ways you can make collections thread safe.

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i am sorry i forgot mentioning that i need the data structure to be threadsafe, i think List are not threadsafe, correct me if i am wrong –  Kazoom Mar 2 '10 at 3:48
    
@Kazoom updated with MSDN article on collection thread safety. –  Corey Sunwold Mar 2 '10 at 3:53

Have you looked into SynchronizedCollection<T>? It is basically a thread-safe version of List<T>.

Note that this collection is part of System.ServiceModel, as it was added to support the channel dispatchers of WCF. It is a public collection that can be used by any code however, and is in the System.Collections.Generic namespace. All of its methods and its indexer are synchronized, so you would not have to manage locking yourself. Beware of LINQ, however, as the enumerator for this collection is not synchronized. You would need to lock on SyncRoot yourself if you wish to use the enumerator or use LINQ:

var syncList = new SynchronizedCollection<int>();
// ...
lock(syncList.SyncRoot)
{
    var itemsInRange = syncList.Where(v => v > 100 && v < 1000);
}

Keep in mind, it uses hard locking (the lock keyword), and with many threads it will not be the most performant solution. If you have the option of using .NET 4.0, I would look into the new System.Collections.Concurrent namespace for some tasty new morsels like ConcurrentBag<T>.

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Yes, but you need to use Generics. Look at the List class in the System.Collections.Generics namespace.

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i am sorry i forgot mentioning that i need the data structure to be threadsafe, i think List are not threadsafe, correct me if i am wrong –  Kazoom Mar 2 '10 at 3:50
    
Public static members of this type are thread safe. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx –  ecounysis Mar 2 '10 at 7:54
    
@ec - Not really. I don't understand why that article says that, but right below it says "A List(T) can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with one or more write accesses, the only way to ensure thread safety is to lock the collection during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization." –  Nick Mar 2 '10 at 14:17

Generic Lists FTW!

var items = new List<someType>();
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i am sorry i forgot mentioning that i need the data structure to be threadsafe, i think List are not threadsafe, correct me if i am wrong –  Kazoom Mar 2 '10 at 3:48
    
Public static members of this type are thread safe. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx –  ecounysis Mar 2 '10 at 7:55

Use System.Collections.Generic.List<T>. If you want thread safe, simply lock the SyncRoot property in your operation.

Some code:

List<string> list = new List<string>();

lock (list.SyncRoot) {
   list.Add("Hello World");
}

If you find every time to lock is annoying, you can override the List class and provide synchronized access on member functions.

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If thread-safety is your concern then perhaps ConcurrentBag<T> would do the trick:

Represents a thread-safe, unordered collection of objects.

Note: This requires .NET 4.

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