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I've prepared a small test table to ask this question:

CREATE TABLE `part_two_cols` (
  `period_type_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `geolocation_id` tinyint(4) unsigned NOT NULL,
  m1 int default 0, 
  m2 int default 0,
  m3 int default 0,
  PRIMARY KEY (`period_type_id`,`geolocation_id`),
  KEY `fk_data_basic_group_id` (`geolocation_id`),
  KEY `fk_data_basic_period_type_id` (`period_type_id`)
);

I want to have a double-column partitioning key (the same columns as in primary key). Each of those columns is an enum which can have 3 different values: 1,2,3. So all possible values are as follows:

INSERT INTO `part_two_cols` (period_type_id, geolocation_id)
VALUES (1,1), (1,2), (1,3), (2,1), (2,2), (2,3), (3,1), (3,2), (3,3);

Now I have 9 records. And I want to prepare such partitions, that each records goes into separate partition. I have been trying the following:

ALTER TABLE `part_two_cols`
PARTITION BY RANGE COLUMNS(period_type_id, geolocation_id) (
    PARTITION p0 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 2),
    PARTITION p1 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 3),
    PARTITION p2 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 4),
    PARTITION p3 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 2),
    PARTITION p4 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 3),
    PARTITION p5 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 4),
    PARTITION p6 VALUES LESS THAN (4, 2),
    PARTITION p7 VALUES LESS THAN (4, 3),
    PARTITION p8 VALUES LESS THAN (4, 4),
    PARTITION p9 VALUES LESS THAN (MAXVALUE, MAXVALUE)
);

and I failed, because when testing EXPLAIN PARTITIONS, the result is not what I expect:

EXPLAIN PARTITIONS SELECT * FROM `part_two_cols` WHERE period_type_id=1|2|3 AND geolocation_id = 1|2|3;

The results I got are stored in following table:

 pt | geo | part
----+-----+------
 1  |  1  |  p0
 1  |  2  |  p0
 1  |  3  |  p0
 2  |  1  |  p0
 2  |  2  |  p1
 2  |  3  |  p2
 3  |  1  |  p3
 3  |  2  |  p4
 3  |  3  |  p5

I wonder why do all pt=1 records fall into partition p0 - that is (1,1), (1,2) and (1,3)? I did a check on a single-column RANGE COLUMNS and I found out that LESS THAN is in fact LESS (and not less or equal, which was my first idea to analyse).

The question is: what to change in above code to make each record fall into a separate partition. And what is the explanation.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution is very unintiutive, at least for me. It turns out, that when MySQL inserts records into a partitioned table it doesn't compare all columns. It compares the first column, if the condition is satisfied, then insertion occurs. If not satisfied, it checks the second column and so on. And that's why (1,1) along with (1,2), (1,3) and (2,1) all fall into p0. This is because (1,1), (1,2) and (1,3) have only 1 compared with 2, it's satisfied, so it's inserted. For (2,1), 2 is compared with 2, not yet satisfied, so it checks second column, 1 < 2 and the second column satisfies the condition. So the fourth record still falls into p0. The fifth record, (2,2) has 2 compared with 2, not yet satisfied. The second column is compared, 2 < 2. Not yet satisfied, but there are no more columns left, so it's not satisfied at all, so it's not p0. But it is satisfied for p1 (second column compared: 2 < 3).

The answer - how to make each record fall into separate partition - is the following:

ALTER TABLE `part_two_cols`
PARTITION BY RANGE COLUMNS(period_type_id, geolocation_id) (
    PARTITION p0 VALUES LESS THAN (1, 2),
    PARTITION p1 VALUES LESS THAN (1, 3),
    PARTITION p2 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 1),
    PARTITION p3 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 2),
    PARTITION p4 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 3),
    PARTITION p5 VALUES LESS THAN (2, 4),
    PARTITION p6 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 2),
    PARTITION p7 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 3),
    PARTITION p8 VALUES LESS THAN (3, 4),
    PARTITION p9 VALUES LESS THAN (MAXVALUE, MAXVALUE)
);

It is logical somehow, but the tricky thing is that I expected that all columns are compared at a time. And MySQL compares as little as possible.

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