Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using xyplot in R to plot several lines (by group) on one graph:

xyplot(y~x,
       type=c('l'),
       scales=list(tck=c(1,0)),
       main=list(label="Total decrease", cex=2),
       xlab=list(label="Years", cex=1.5),
       ylab=list(label="Percentage", cex=1.5),
       groups= group,
       data=df,
       auto.key=list(columns=2, lines=TRUE, points=FALSE, cex=1.5))

However, I am unable to change the size of the label values. I have tried changing the argument cex.axis (within the xlab and ylab options), but this does not change the size of values along either the x- or the y-axes.

Can anybody help?

Thanks in advance, Mark

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With lattice plotting functions, use scales=list(cex=1.5) to set cex for tick labels along both axes.

To specify different cex values for x- and y- axes, do something like this:

library(lattice)
xyplot(mpg~disp, data=mtcars, 
       scales=list(tck=c(1,0), x=list(cex=1.2), y=list(cex=1.5)))

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Josh, that works a treat. –  user3628889 May 12 '14 at 16:17

My solution: generate pdf first, then edit in a pdf editor. To change font family, this is my story.

I am doing my dissertation and may need to deal with the linear mixed modeling. In order to view the individual data instead of group means, I find the xyplot function in lattice library in R is exactly what I need. I have been playing with various parameters in xyplot for hours. One of the settings I cannot figure out easily (actually I tried goggle really hard, but still were not able to find an ideal solution for) is the FONT in the resultant plot. Driving me crazy… Then I got an idea: why not saving the pdf first, and then replacing all the fonts in the pdf with some kind of editor? After a bit of search, I came across Infix PDF Editor, which is able to replace fonts in a batch! So the bottom line is: generate xyplot from R, and then replace the fonts in pdf with Infix PDF Editor. No more playing with confusing parameters…

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.