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Silly question, but why does the following line compile?

int[] i = new int[] {1,};

As you can see, I haven't entered in the second element and left a comma there. Still compiles even though you would expect it not to.

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4  
    
I'm amazed anyone would be satisfied with the answer "Because that's what the spec says". Steck's and Jimmy's answers explain why it is beneficial. –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 2 '10 at 7:16
    
I voted it up because I was impressed by the arrow.... –  Jimmy Mar 2 '10 at 7:20
    
Oh yes, the arrow is fantastic. No one is complaining about the arrow. –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 2 '10 at 7:27
    
@Earwicker: The question is not "How can I use this trailing comma?", but "Why does it compile"? From question to answer... –  Luca Mar 8 '10 at 17:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I suppose because the ECMA 334 standard say:

array-initializer:
    { variable-initializer-list(opt) }
    { variable-initializer-list , }
variable-initializer-list:
    variable-initializer
    variable-initializer-list , variable-initializer
variable-initializer:
    expression
    array-initializer

As you can see, the trailing comma is allowed:

{ variable-initializer-list , }
                            ↑

P.S. for a good answer (even if this fact was already pointed by many users). :)

Trailing comma could be used to ease the implementation of automatic code generators (generators can avoid to test for last element in initializer, since it should be written without the trailing comma) and conditional array initialization with preprocessor directives.

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It should compile by definition.

There is no second element. A trailing comma is valid syntax when defining a collection of items.

i is an array of int containing a single element, i[0] containing the value 1.

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That extra comma tells me another value is expected. –  Vince Panuccio Mar 2 '10 at 6:29
7  
That may be your interpretation, but that's not how it is defined. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 2 '10 at 6:30
    
That may be the case but it still doesn't make any sense regardless of the spec. –  Vince Panuccio Mar 2 '10 at 6:32
2  
But it is still the answer. That snippet is legal because of the spec, and Jimmy gives the reasoning behind this decision. –  Dykam Mar 2 '10 at 6:36
1  
Go yell at everyone who wrote C, Java, and C# to change the spec. –  Jon Limjap Mar 2 '10 at 6:37

its so you can do this and copy/paste lines around without worrying about deleting/adding the commas in the correct places.

int[] i = new[] { 
   someValue(),
   someOtherValue(),
   someOtherOtherValue(),

   // copy-pasted zomg! the commas don't hurt!
   someValue(),
   someOtherValue(),
   someOtherOtherValue(),

};
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According to a similar post that <a href='stackoverflow.com/users/19750/jleedev'>jleedev</a>; <a href='stackoverflow.com/questions/2311864/… out</a>, its to make automatic code generation easier. Just caught me by supprise thats all :-) –  Vince Panuccio Mar 2 '10 at 6:35

This is syntax sugar. In particular, such record can be useful in code generation.

int[] i = new int[] {
    1,
    2,
    3,
};

Also, when you are writing like this, to add new line you need to add text only in single line.

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1  
Annoying that this is allowed in arrays, but not in Enums, where they would be much more useful. –  Jon Limjap Mar 2 '10 at 6:38
3  
it is allowed in enums (just tried in C# 3.0) –  Mitch Wheat Mar 2 '10 at 6:40
    
IMO, this and Jimmy's answer should be edited together and then the result accepted! And I would add the observation that this is how ; works between statements, for exactly the same reason. And that in Erlang, where the trailing symbol is different (a dot instead of a comma), it may appear comfortingly similar to English at first but users end up hating it for the same reasons given here. –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 2 '10 at 7:24
    
It works in object initializers as well. –  Frode N. Rosand Mar 8 '10 at 21:07

Another benefit of allowing a trailing comma is in combination with preprocessor directives:

int[] i = new[] {
#if INCLUDE1
   1,
#endif

#if INCLUDE2
   2,
#endif

#if INCLUDE3
   3,
#endif
};

Without allowing a trailing comma, that would be much more difficult to write.

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Same goes for enums:

enum Foo
{
  Bar,
  Baz,
};
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