Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the most elegant way to split a string in C++? The string can be assumed to be composed of words separated by whitespace.

(Note that I'm not interested in C string functions or that kind of character manipulation/access. Also, please give precedence to elegance over efficiency in your answer.)

The best solution I have right now is:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string s("Somewhere down the road");
    istringstream iss(s);

    do
    {
        string sub;
        iss >> sub;
        cout << "Substring: " << sub << endl;
    } while (iss);

}
share|improve this question
303  
Dude... Elegance is just a fancy way to say "efficiency-that-looks-pretty" in my book. Don't shy away from using C functions and quick methods to accomplish anything just because it is not contained within a template ;) –  nlaq Oct 25 '08 at 9:04
14  
Your code won't compile (sometimes the pertinent variable is called "subs", sometimes "substr") but there's a more serious off-by-one problem: it will always try to output one more token than actually exists because you only test iss after printing the token. –  j_random_hacker Aug 24 '09 at 8:57
5  
while (iss) { string subs; iss >> subs; cout << "Substring: " << sub << endl; } –  Eduardo León Sep 29 '09 at 15:47
20  
How about some of the examples from the following: codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Tokenizer.aspx They are very efficient and somewhat elegant. –  Matthieu N. Sep 15 '10 at 3:21
9  
@Eduardo: that's wrong too... you need to test iss between trying to stream another value and using that value, i.e. string sub; while (iss >> sub) cout << "Substring: " << sub << '\n'; –  Tony D Apr 11 '12 at 2:24

55 Answers 55

I use the following code:

namespace Core
{
    typedef std::wstring String;

    void SplitString(const Core::String& input, const Core::String& splitter, std::list<Core::String>& output)
    {
        if (splitter.empty())
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument(); // for example
        }

        std::list<Core::String> lines;

        Core::String::size_type offset = 0;

        for (;;)
        {
            Core::String::size_type splitterPos = input.find(splitter, offset);

            if (splitterPos != Core::String::npos)
            {
                lines.push_back(input.substr(offset, splitterPos - offset));
                offset = splitterPos + splitter.size();
            }
            else
            {
                lines.push_back(input.substr(offset));
                break;
            }
        }

        lines.swap(output);
    }
}

// gtest:

class SplitStringTest: public testing::Test
{
};

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, EmptyStringAndSplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;
    ASSERT_ANY_THROW(Core::SplitString(Core::String(), Core::String(), result));
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, NonEmptyStringAndEmptySplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;
    ASSERT_ANY_THROW(Core::SplitString(L"xy", Core::String(), result));
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, EmptyStringAndNonEmptySplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;
    Core::SplitString(Core::String(), Core::String(L","), result);
    ASSERT_EQ(1, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.begin());
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, OneCharSplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;

    Core::SplitString(L"x,y", L",", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"x", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"y", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L",xy", L",", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"xy", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L"xy,", L",", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"xy", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.rbegin());
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, TwoCharsSplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;

    Core::SplitString(L"x,.y,z", L",.", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"x", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"y,z", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L"x,,y,z", L",,", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"x", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"y,z", *result.rbegin());
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, RecursiveSplitter)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;

    Core::SplitString(L",,,", L",,", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L",", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L",.,.,", L",.,", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L".,", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L"x,.,.,y", L",.,", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"x", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L".,y", *result.rbegin());

    Core::SplitString(L",.,,.,", L",.,", result);
    ASSERT_EQ(3, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *(++result.begin()));
    ASSERT_EQ(Core::String(), *result.rbegin());
}

TEST_F(SplitStringTest, NullTerminators)
{
    std::list<Core::String> result;

    Core::SplitString(L"xy", Core::String(L"\0", 1), result);
    ASSERT_EQ(1, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"xy", *result.begin());

    Core::SplitString(Core::String(L"x\0y", 3), Core::String(L"\0", 1), result);
    ASSERT_EQ(2, result.size());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"x", *result.begin());
    ASSERT_EQ(L"y", *result.rbegin());
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a simple solution that uses only the standard regex library

#include <regex>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

std::vector<string> Tokenize( const string str, const std::regex regex )
{
    using namespace std;

    std::vector<string> result;

    sregex_token_iterator it( str.begin(), str.end(), regex, -1 );
    sregex_token_iterator reg_end;

    for ( ; it != reg_end; ++it ) {
        if ( !it->str().empty() ) //token could be empty:check
            result.emplace_back( it->str() );
    }

    return result;
}

The regex argument allows checking for multiple arguments (spaces, commas, etc.)

I usually only check to split on spaces and commas, so I also have this default function:

std::vector<string> TokenizeDefault( const string str )
{
    using namespace std;

    regex re( "[\\s,]+" );

    return Tokenize( str, re );
}

The "[\\s,]+" checks for spaces (\\s) and commas (,).

Note, if you want to split wstring instead of string,

  • change all std::regex to std::wregex
  • change all sregex_token_iterator to wsregex_token_iterator

Note, you might also want to take the string argument by reference, depending on your compiler.

share|improve this answer

This is my versión taken the source of Kev:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
void split(vector<string> &result, string str, char delim ) {
  string tmp;
  string::iterator i;
  result.clear();

  for(i = str.begin(); i <= str.end(); ++i) {
    if((const char)*i != delim  && i != str.end()) {
      tmp += *i;
    } else {
      result.push_back(tmp);
      tmp = "";
    }
  }
}

After, call the function and do something with it:

vector<string> hosts;
split(hosts, "192.168.1.2,192.168.1.3", ',');
for( size_t i = 0; i < hosts.size(); i++){
  cout <<  "Connecting host : " << hosts.at(i) << "..." << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

Quick version which uses vector as the base class, giving full access to all of its operators:

    // Split string into parts.
    class Split : public std::vector<std::string>
    {
        public:
            Split(const std::string& str, char* delimList)
            {
               size_t lastPos = 0;
               size_t pos = str.find_first_of(delimList);

               while (pos != std::string::npos)
               {
                    if (pos != lastPos)
                        push_back(str.substr(lastPos, pos-lastPos));
                    lastPos = pos + 1;
                    pos = str.find_first_of(delimList, lastPos);
               }
               if (lastPos < str.length())
                   push_back(str.substr(lastPos, pos-lastPos));
            }
    };

Example used to populate an STL set:

std::set<std::string> words;
Split split("hello,world", ",");
words.insert(split.begin(), split.end());
share|improve this answer
1  
Inefficient and you're deriving from an STL container - possibly one of the worst things you could do. –  Xander Tulip Mar 19 '12 at 0:18

This is a function I wrote that helps me do a lot. It helped me when doing protocol for WebSockets. Have Fun!

using namespace std;
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

vector<string> split ( string input , string split_id ) {
  vector<string> result;
  int i = 0;
  bool add;
  string temp;
  stringstream ss;
  size_t found;
  string real;
  int r = 0;
    while ( i != input.length() ) {
        add = false;
        ss << input.at(i);
        temp = ss.str();
        found = temp.find(split_id);
        if ( found != string::npos ) {
            add = true;
            real.append ( temp , 0 , found );
        } else if ( r > 0 &&  ( i+1 ) == input.length() ) {
            add = true;
            real.append ( temp , 0 , found );
        }
        if ( add ) {
            result.push_back(real);
            ss.str(string());
            ss.clear();
            temp.clear();
            real.clear();
            r = 0;
        }
        i++;
        r++;
    }
  return result;
}

int main() {
    string s = "S,o,m,e,w,h,e,r,e, down the road \n In a really big C++ house.  \n  Lives a little old lady.   \n   That no one ever knew.    \n    She comes outside.     \n     In the very hot sun.      \n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n   And throws C++ at us.    \n    The End.  FIN.";
    vector < string > Token;
    Token = split ( s , "," );
    for ( int i = 0 ; i < Token.size(); i++)    cout << Token.at(i) << endl;
    cout << endl << Token.size();
    int a;
    cin >> a;
    return a;
}
share|improve this answer

No Boost, no string streams, just the standard C library cooperating together with std::string and std::list: C library functions for easy analysis, C++ data types for easy memory management.

Whitespace is considered to be any combination of newlines, tabs and spaces. The set of whitespace characters is established by the wschars variable.

#include <string>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

const char *wschars = "\t\n ";

list<string> split(const string &str)
{
  const char *cstr = str.c_str();
  list<string> out;

  while (*cstr) {                     // while remaining string not empty
    size_t toklen;
    cstr += strspn(cstr, wschars);    // skip leading whitespace
    toklen = strcspn(cstr, wschars);  // figure out token length
    if (toklen)                       // if we have a token, add to list
      out.push_back(string(cstr, toklen));
    cstr += toklen;                   // skip over token
  }

  // ran out of string; return list

  return out;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  list<string> li = split(argv[1]);
  for (list<string>::iterator i = li.begin(); i != li.end(); i++)
    cout << "{" << *i << "}" << endl;
  return 0;
}

Run:

$ ./split ""
$ ./split "a"
{a}
$ ./split " a "
{a}
$ ./split " a b"
{a}
{b}
$ ./split " a b c"
{a}
{b}
{c}
$ ./split " a b c d  "
{a}
{b}
{c}
{d}

Tail-recursive version of split (itself split into two functions). All destructive manipulation of variables is gone, except for the pushing of strings into the list!

void split_rec(const char *cstr, list<string> &li)
{
  if (*cstr) {
    const size_t leadsp = strspn(cstr, wschars);
    const size_t toklen = strcspn(cstr + leadsp, wschars);

    if (toklen)
      li.push_back(string(cstr + leadsp, toklen));

    split_rec(cstr + leadsp + toklen, li);
  }
}

list<string> split(const string &str)
{
  list<string> out;
  split_rec(str.c_str(), out);
  return out;
}
share|improve this answer

I use the following

void split(string in, vector<string>& parts, char separator) {
    string::iterator  ts, curr;
    ts = curr = in.begin();
    for(; curr <= in.end(); curr++ ) {
        if( (curr == in.end() || *curr == separator) && curr > ts )
               parts.push_back( string( ts, curr ));
        if( curr == in.end() )
               break;
        if( *curr == separator ) ts = curr + 1; 
    }
}

PlasmaHH, I forgot to include the extra check( curr > ts) for removing tokens with whitespace.

share|improve this answer

My code is:

#include <list>
#include <string>
template<class StringType = std::string, class ContainerType = std::list<StringType> >
class DSplitString:public ContainerType
{
public:
    explicit DSplitString(const StringType& strString, char cChar, bool bSkipEmptyParts = true)
    {
        size_t iPos = 0;
        size_t iPos_char = 0;
        while(StringType::npos != (iPos_char = strString.find(cChar, iPos)))
        {
            StringType strTemp = strString.substr(iPos, iPos_char - iPos);
            if((bSkipEmptyParts && !strTemp.empty()) || (!bSkipEmptyParts))
                push_back(strTemp);
            iPos = iPos_char + 1;
        }
    }
    explicit DSplitString(const StringType& strString, const StringType& strSub, bool bSkipEmptyParts = true)
    {
        size_t iPos = 0;
        size_t iPos_char = 0;
        while(StringType::npos != (iPos_char = strString.find(strSub, iPos)))
        {
            StringType strTemp = strString.substr(iPos, iPos_char - iPos);
            if((bSkipEmptyParts && !strTemp.empty()) || (!bSkipEmptyParts))
                push_back(strTemp);
            iPos = iPos_char + strSub.length();
        }
    }
};

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    DSplitString<> aa("doicanhden1;doicanhden2;doicanhden3;", ';');
    for each (std::string var in aa)
    {
        std::cout << var << std::endl;
    }
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I believe no one has posted this solution yet. Instead of using delimiters directly, it basically does the same as boost::split(), i.e., it allows you to pass a predicate that returns true if a char is a delimiter, and false otherwise. I think this gives the programmer a lot more control, and the great thing is you don't need boost.

template <class Container, class String, class Predicate>
void split(Container& output, const String& input,
           const Predicate& pred, bool trimEmpty = false) {
    auto it = begin(input);
    auto itLast = it;
    while (it = find_if(it, end(input), pred), it != end(input)) {
        if (not (trimEmpty and it == itLast)) {
            output.emplace_back(itLast, it);
        }
        ++it;
        itLast = it;
    }
}

Then you can use it like this:

struct Delim {
    bool operator()(char c) {
        return not isalpha(c);
    }
};    

int main() {
    string s("#include<iostream>\n"
             "int main() { std::cout << \"Hello world!\" << std::endl; }");

    vector<string> v;

    split(v, s, Delim(), true);
    /* Which is also the same as */
    split(v, s, [](char c) { return not isalpha(c); }, true);

    for (const auto& i : v) {
        cout << i << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I have just written a fine example of how to split a char by symbol, which then places each array of chars (words seperated by your symbol) into a vector. For simplicity i made the vector type of std string.

I hope this helps and is readable to you.

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

void push(std::vector<std::string> &WORDS, std::string &TMP){
    WORDS.push_back(TMP);
    TMP = "";
}
std::vector<std::string> mySplit(char STRING[]){
        std::vector<std::string> words;
        std::string s;
        for(unsigned short i = 0; i < strlen(STRING); i++){
            if(STRING[i] != ' '){
                s += STRING[i];
            }else{
                push(words, s);
            }
        }
        push(words, s);//Used to get last split
        return words;
}

int main(){
    char string[] = "My awesome string.";
    std::cout << mySplit(string)[2];
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<sstream>
#include<vector>
using namespace std;

    vector<string> split(const string &s, char delim) {
        vector<string> elems;
        stringstream ss(s);
        string item;
        while (getline(ss, item, delim)) {
            elems.push_back(item);
        }
        return elems;
    }

int main() {

        vector<string> x = split("thi is an sample test",' ');
        unsigned int i;
        for(i=0;i<x.size();i++)
            cout<<i<<":"<<x[i]<<endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

LazyStringSplitter:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <unordered_set>

using namespace std;

class LazyStringSplitter
{
    string::const_iterator start, finish;
    unordered_set<char> chop;

public:

    // Empty Constructor
    explicit LazyStringSplitter()
    {}

    explicit LazyStringSplitter (const string cstr, const string delims)
        : start(cstr.begin())
        , finish(cstr.end())
        , chop(delims.begin(), delims.end())
    {}

    void operator () (const string cstr, const string delims)
    {
        chop.insert(delims.begin(), delims.end());
        start = cstr.begin();
        finish = cstr.end();
    }

    bool empty() const { return (start >= finish); }

    string next()
    {
        // return empty string
        // if ran out of characters
        if (empty())
            return string("");

        auto runner = find_if(start, finish, [&](char c) {
            return chop.count(c) == 1;
        });

        // construct next string
        string ret(start, runner);
        start = runner + 1;

        // Never return empty string
        // + tail recursion makes this method efficient
        return !ret.empty() ? ret : next();
    }
};
  • I call this method the LazyStringSplitter because of one reason - It does not split the string in one go.
  • In essence it behaves like a python generator
  • It exposes a method called next which returns the next string that is split from the original
  • I made use of the unordered_set from c++11 STL, so that look up of delimiters is that much faster
  • And here is how it works

TEST PROGRAM

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    LazyStringSplitter splitter;

    // split at the characters ' ', '!', '.', ','
    splitter("This, is a string. And here is another string! Let's test and see how well this does.", " !.,");

    while (!splitter.empty())
        cout << splitter.next() << endl;
    return 0;
}

OUTPUT

This
is
a
string
And
here
is
another
string
Let's
test
and
see
how
well
this
does

Next plan to improve this is to implement begin and end methods so that one can do something like:

vector<string> split_string(splitter.begin(), splitter.end());
share|improve this answer

I've been searching for a way to split a string by a separator of any length, so I started writing it from scratch, as existing solutions didn't suit me.

Here is my little algorithm, using only STL:

//use like this
//std::vector<std::wstring> vec = Split<std::wstring> (L"Hello##world##!", L"##");

template <typename valueType>
static std::vector <valueType> Split (valueType text, const valueType& delimiter)
{
    std::vector <valueType> tokens;
    size_t pos = 0;
    valueType token;

    while ((pos = text.find(delimiter)) != valueType::npos) 
    {
        token = text.substr(0, pos);
        tokens.push_back (token);
        text.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
    }
    tokens.push_back (text);

    return tokens;
}

It can be used with separator of any length and form, as far as I've tested. Instantiate with either string or wstring type.

All the algorithm does is it searches for the delimiter, gets the part of the string that is up to the delimiter, deletes the delimiter and searches again until it finds it no more.

Of course, you can use any number of whitespaces for the delimiter.

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Here is my solution using C++11 and the STL. It should be reasonably efficient:

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string& s)
{
    std::vector<std::string> v;

    auto done = s.end();
    auto end = s.begin();
    decltype(end) pos;

    while((pos = std::find_if(end, done, std::not1(std::ptr_fun(isspace)))) != done)
    {
        end = std::find_if(pos, done, std::ptr_fun(isspace));
        v.emplace_back(pos, end);
    }
    return v;
}

int main()
{
    std::string s = "this is the string  to  split";

    std::vector<std::string> v;

    v = split(s);

    for(auto&& s: v)
        std::cout << s << '\n';
}

Output:

this
is
the
string
to
split
share|improve this answer

When dealing whitespace as separator, the obvious answer of using std::istream_iterator<T> is already given and voted up a lot. Of course, elements may not be separated by whitespace but by some separator instead. I didn't spot any answer which just redefines the meaning of whitespace to be said separator and then uses the conventional approach.

The way to change what streams consider whitespace, you'd simply change the stream's std::locale using (std::istream::imbue()) with a std::ctype<char> facet with its own definition of what whitespace means (it can be done for std::ctype<wchar_t>, too, but its is actually slightly different because std::ctype<char> is table-driven while std::ctype<wchar_t> is driven by virtual functions).

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>
#include <locale>

struct whitespace_mask {
    std::ctype_base::mask mask_table[std::ctype<char>::table_size];
    whitespace_mask(std::string const& spaces) {
        std::ctype_base::mask* table = this->mask_table;
        std::ctype_base::mask const* tab
            = std::use_facet<std::ctype<char>>(std::locale()).table();
        for (std::size_t i(0); i != std::ctype<char>::table_size; ++i) {
            table[i] = tab[i] & ~std::ctype_base::space;
        }
        std::for_each(spaces.begin(), spaces.end(), [=](unsigned char c) {
            table[c] |= std::ctype_base::space;
        });
    }
};
class whitespace_facet
    : private whitespace_mask
    , public std::ctype<char> {
public:
    whitespace_facet(std::string const& spaces)
        : whitespace_mask(spaces)
        , std::ctype<char>(this->mask_table) {
    }
};

struct whitespace {
    std::string spaces;
    whitespace(std::string const& spaces): spaces(spaces) {}
};
std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, whitespace const& ws) {
    std::locale loc(in.getloc(), new whitespace_facet(ws.spaces));
    in.imbue(loc);
    return in;
}
// everything above would probably go into a utility library...

int main() {
    std::istringstream in("a, b, c, d, e");
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(in >> whitespace(", ")),
              std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
              std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));

    std::istringstream pipes("a b c|  d |e     e");
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(pipes >> whitespace("|")),
              std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
              std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));   
}

Most of the code is for packaging up a general purpose tool providing soft delimiters: multiple delimiters in a row are merged. There is no way to produce an empty sequence. When different delimiters are needed within a stream, you'd probably use differently set up streams using a shared stream buffer:

void f(std::istream& in) {
    std::istream pipes(in.rdbuf());
    pipes >> whitespace("|");
    std::istream comma(in.rdbuf());
    comma >> whitespace(",");

    std::string s0, s1;
    if (pipes >> s0 >> std::ws   // read up to first pipe and ignore sequence of pipes
        && comma >> s1 >> std::ws) { // read up to first comma and ignore commas
        // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My implementation can be an alternative solution:

std::vector<std::wstring> SplitString(const std::wstring & String, const std::wstring & Seperator)
{
    std::vector<std::wstring> Lines;
    size_t stSearchPos = 0;
    size_t stFoundPos;
    while (stSearchPos < String.size() - 1)
    {
        stFoundPos = String.find(Seperator, stSearchPos);
        stFoundPos = (stFoundPos == std::string::npos) ? String.size() : stFoundPos;
        Lines.push_back(String.substr(stSearchPos, stFoundPos - stSearchPos));
        stSearchPos = stFoundPos + Seperator.size();
    }
    return Lines;
}

Test code:

std::wstring MyString(L"Part 1SEPsecond partSEPlast partSEPend");
std::vector<std::wstring> Parts = IniFile::SplitString(MyString, L"SEP");
std::wcout << L"The string: " << MyString << std::endl;
for (std::vector<std::wstring>::const_iterator it=Parts.begin(); it<Parts.end(); ++it)
{
    std::wcout << *it << L"<---" << std::endl;
}
std::wcout << std::endl;
MyString = L"this,time,a,comma separated,string";
std::wcout << L"The string: " << MyString << std::endl;
Parts = IniFile::SplitString(MyString, L",");
for (std::vector<std::wstring>::const_iterator it=Parts.begin(); it<Parts.end(); ++it)
{
    std::wcout << *it << L"<---" << std::endl;
}

Output of the test code:

The string: Part 1SEPsecond partSEPlast partSEPend
Part 1<---
second part<---
last part<---
end<---

The string: this,time,a,comma separated,string
this<---
time<---
a<---
comma separated<---
string<---
share|improve this answer

There are already a lot of good answers to this questions, this is just a tiny detail.

Splitting a string for output is one thing, but if you split into a container like vector, a call to reserve() can make a difference in performance, because the splitting will cause "concurrent" allocations of chunks in different sizes.

Even if the elegance may suffer from it, a little preceding analysis may be considered:

#include <algorithm>
size_t n = std::count(s.begin(), s.end(), ' ');
share|improve this answer

Here's my approach, cut and split:

string cut (string& str, const string& del)
{
    string f = str;

    if (in.find_first_of(del) != string::npos)
    {
        f = str.substr(0,str.find_first_of(del));
        str = str.substr(str.find_first_of(del)+del.length());
    }

    return f;
}

vector<string> split (const string& in, const string& del=" ")
{
    vector<string> out();
    string t = in;

    while (t.length() > del.length())
        out.push_back(cut(t,del));

    return out;
}

BTW, if there's something I can do to optimize this ..

share|improve this answer
// adapted from a "regular" csv parse
std::string stringIn = "my csv  is 10233478 NOTseparated by commas";
std::vector<std::string> commaSeparated(1);
int commaCounter = 0;
for (int i=0; i<stringIn.size(); i++) {
    if (stringIn[i] == " ") {
        commaSeparated.push_back("");
        commaCounter++;
    } else {
        commaSeparated.at(commaCounter) += stringIn[i];
    }
}

in the end you will have a vector of strings with every element in the sentence separated by spaces. only non-standard resource is std::vector (but since an std::string is involved, i figured it would be acceptable).

empty strings are saved as a separate items.

share|improve this answer

Here is my version

#include <vector>

inline std::vector<std::string> Split(const std::string &str, const std::string &delim = " ")
{
    std::vector<std::string> tokens;
    if (str.size() > 0)
    {
        if (delim.size() > 0)
        {
            std::string::size_type currPos = 0, prevPos = 0;
            while ((currPos = str.find(delim, prevPos)) != std::string::npos)
            {
                std::string item = str.substr(prevPos, currPos - prevPos);
                if (item.size() > 0)
                {
                    tokens.push_back(item);
                }
                prevPos = currPos + 1;
            }
            tokens.push_back(str.substr(prevPos));
        }
        else
        {
            tokens.push_back(str);
        }
    }
    return tokens;
}

It works with multi-character delimiters. It prevents empty tokens to get in your results. It uses a single header. It returns the string as one single token when you provide no delimiter. It also returns an empty result if the string is empty. It is unfortunately inefficient because of the huge std::vector copy UNLESS you are compiling using C++11, which should be using the move schematic. In C++11, this code should be fast.

share|improve this answer

very late to the party here I know but I was thinking about the most elegant way of doing this if you were given a range of delimiters rather than whitespace, and using nothing more than the standard library.

Here are my thoughts:

to split words into a string vector by a sequence of delimiters:

template<class Container>
std::vector<std::string> split_by_delimiters(const std::string& input, const Container& delimiters)
{
    std::vector<std::string> result;

    for (auto current = begin(input) ; current != end(input) ; )
    {
        auto first = find_if(current, end(input), not_in(delimiters));
        if (first == end(input)) break;
        auto last = find_if(first, end(input), is_in(delimiters));
        result.emplace_back(first, last);
        current = last;
    }
    return result;
}

to split the other way, by providing a sequence of valid characters:

template<class Container>
std::vector<std::string> split_by_valid_chars(const std::string& input, const Container& valid_chars)
{
    std::vector<std::string> result;

    for (auto current = begin(input) ; current != end(input) ; )
    {
        auto first = find_if(current, end(input), is_in(valid_chars));
        if (first == end(input)) break;
        auto last = find_if(first, end(input), not_in(valid_chars));
        result.emplace_back(first, last);
        current = last;
    }
    return result;
}

is_in and not_in are defined thus:

namespace detail {
    template<class Container>
    struct is_in {
        is_in(const Container& charset)
        : _charset(charset)
        {}

        bool operator()(char c) const
        {
            return find(begin(_charset), end(_charset), c) != end(_charset);
        }

        const Container& _charset;
    };

    template<class Container>
    struct not_in {
        not_in(const Container& charset)
        : _charset(charset)
        {}

        bool operator()(char c) const
        {
            return find(begin(_charset), end(_charset), c) == end(_charset);
        }

        const Container& _charset;
    };

}

template<class Container>
detail::not_in<Container> not_in(const Container& c)
{
    return detail::not_in<Container>(c);
}

template<class Container>
detail::is_in<Container> is_in(const Container& c)
{
    return detail::is_in<Container>(c);
}
share|improve this answer

For a ridiculously large and probably redundant version, try a lot of for loops.

string stringlist[10];
int count = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < sequence.length(); i++)
{
	if (sequence[i] == ' ')
	{
		stringlist[count] = sequence.substr(0, i);
		sequence.erase(0, i+1);
		i = 0;
		count++;
	}
	else if (i == sequence.length()-1)	// Last word
	{
		stringlist[count] = sequence.substr(0, i+1);
	}
}

It isn't pretty, but by and large (Barring punctuation and a slew of other bugs) it works!

share|improve this answer
18  
I was tempted to +1 this answer for its simple, readable code (which I presume rubbed an elegantophile the wrong way, hence the -1), but then I saw that you allocated a fixed-size array of strings to hold the tokens. Come on, you know that's gonna break at the worst possible moment! :) –  j_random_hacker Aug 24 '09 at 9:14
void splitString(string str, char delim, string array[], const int arraySize)
{
    int delimPosition, subStrSize, subStrStart = 0;

    for (int index = 0; delimPosition != -1; index++)
    {
        delimPosition = str.find(delim, subStrStart);

        subStrSize = delimPosition - subStrStart;
        array[index] = str.substr(subStrStart, subStrSize);

        subStrStart =+ (delimPosition + 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Add a narrative –  Ed Heal Dec 4 '12 at 23:20
3  
Welcome to StackOverflow. Your answer would be improved if you described the code a bit further. What differentiates it from the one (very high scoring) answers on this old question? –  marko Dec 4 '12 at 23:20

since no one answers the right answer I'm posting the simplest way to split string

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string mystr, first, second;
    mystr = "first second";
    string::size_type pos = mystr.find_first_of(" ");
    first = mystr.substr(0, pos);
    second = mystr.substr(pos+1);
    cout << first << endl;
    cout << second << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Blorgbeard Dec 4 '12 at 23:26

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.