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We are using JSF in our project (im pretty new to it) were every page have a back bean Java file.

In order to move (redirect) from one page to another, i need to put all the parameters (search criteria) in the request scope before redirecting and then retrieve it back in the next page constructor. When you have few pages deep and you want to come back to the top, it becomes really annoying to maintain.

For example, if i have page 1 with advanced search filters, which redirects to page 2, depending on the chosen item, and from page 2, you get another list were you can go to page 3 for details. Now each time i need to put all the params in the request scope/read them again, store them in hidden fields and get them back.

Whats exactly wrong with this method and whats a better way to do it in JSF?

EDIT: the environment is IBM Rational Application Developer (RAD), which have its own JSF implementation. Not sure if that makes a difference.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Putting request scoped data in session scope will bite you (very) hard if you're going to open the same page in multiple windows/tabs. Only use the session scope if the data itself is also really session scoped (excellent examples are the "logged-in user" and the "shopping cart", you want it to be exactly the same throughout the entire session). Again, don't put request scoped data in the session scope. It hurts both you and the enduser.

Just design your beans smart (it makes no sense to have different beans containing the same data) and make use of h:inputHidden where needed, if necessary in combination with managed property injection. It's indeed a bit a pain to code and maintain. You can on the other hand also just grab Tomahawk <t:saveState> if the to-be-passed data is actually as big as a "whole" managed bean. It costs only a single line in the JSF page and has always been of great assistance.

*For example, if i have page 1 with advanced search filters, which redirects to page 2, depending on the chosen item, and from page 2, you get another list were you can go to page 3 for details. Now each time i need to put all the params in the request scope/read them again, store them in hidden fields and get them back.

Whats exactly wrong with this method and whats a better way to do it in JSF?*

There's nothing wrong with this method. Maybe you coded it the wrong way which caused that it looks unnecessarily overcomplicated. I can't tell much as long as you don't post details about the code used.

As per your edit:

EDIT: the environment is IBM Rational Application Developer (RAD), which have its own JSF implementation. Not sure if that makes a difference.

This is not true. IBM doesn't have any JSF implementation. It has just a component library (the poorly maintained hx prefixed components, also known as "Faces Client Framework"). WSAD/RAD ships with Sun JSF RI (Mojarra) as standard JSF implementation, although it's usually a heavily outdated version. Ensure that you keep it updated.

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yea, we use the hx library heavily. Will take a look at Tomahawk for sure. Thanks –  medopal Mar 2 '10 at 12:59

I'm only starting out with JSF too to be honest, but I thought you can save managed beans in the session scope, thus being able to access the bean on each request? You can also save the state client-side avoiding nastiness about session stickyness and stuff.

So you could save the data you are currently passing as request parameters in a session-scoped managed bean, and it will be available to any requests in that user's session, destroyed when the session times out or is deliberately invalidated (say on user logout).

I don't think JSF currently supports conversation state which I think might be the exact solution to your problem, maybe a session scoped managed bean would be the pragmatic solution?

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i just noticed you mentioned session scoped beans, after @Padmarag answer, i believe thats the least hurting way. I say least hurting because i think there should be something better –  medopal Mar 2 '10 at 10:24
    
@medopal There indeed should be. It is being provided in JSR-299 CDI. For some details check java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/JavaEE/… –  Padmarag Mar 2 '10 at 12:25
    
i think jsf2.0 has somethg called view scope which is longer than request scope but shorter than a session scope. –  Inv3r53 Mar 3 '10 at 8:44

Make your managed-bean session scoped.
If you are using MyFaces you can use PageFlowScope. If using Seam then use Conversation scope.
If pageflowscope or conversation scope is not available, then use session scoped beans. In addition you can use PhaseListener to initialize or execute specific methods before the page gets called. In you case if the flow is page1 -> page2 -> page3, then initialize the session scoped bean in PhaseListener if page1 gets called.
I'll update with more info if you need.

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nop, pretty sure its not MyFaces, no idea about Seam, we are using IBM RAD, i think its IBMs own JSF implementation. Adding that to the question. –  medopal Mar 2 '10 at 9:20
    
In that case use the session scope. I'm updating my answer. –  Padmarag Mar 2 '10 at 9:27

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