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I'm using the following function for drawing a polygon:

void DrawFigure(tNo *iniList)
{
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    glBegin(GL_LINE_LOOP);
        // Run through a linked list and create the points.
        for(tNo *p = iniList->prox; p != NULL; p = p->prox)
            glVertex2f(p->x, p->y);
    glEnd();

    glFlush();
}

I know about glRotatef(angle, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f) and it really works properly, but since I have a linked list to store the coordinates I'd like to rotate point by point and then redisplay the figure.

Currently, I'm trying to rotate them around z-axis with

void RotateFigure(tNo *iniList, float angle)
{
    /* Rotation (assuming origin as reference):
     * x' = x.cos(Θ) - y.sin(Θ)
     * y' = x.sin(Θ) + y.cos(Θ)
     */

    for(tNo *p = iniList->prox; p != NULL; p = p->prox)
    {
        float oldX = p->x, oldY = p->y;
        p->x = oldX * cos(angle) - oldY * sin(angle);
        p->y = oldX * sin(angle) + oldY * cos(angle);
    }

    glutPostRedisplay();
}

but there's a huge difference between glRotatef's rotation and this one (not only due to floating-point imprecisions).

Am I missing anything? Isn't there a better approach for rotating the points manually?

share|improve this question
    
Where is the origin? You normally need to translate to origin then rotate –  Martin Beckett May 12 '14 at 20:39
    
I'm assuming that the origin is at (0,0). In fact, RotateFigure is rotating the points around the origin "correctly", but the rotation's angle seems to be completely imprecise when using it instead of glRotatef. –  Guilherme Agostinelli May 12 '14 at 20:51
    
You're rotating in whatever space the points are currently in. glRotatef multiplies the current matrix (modelview or projection) by the rotation matrix and then uses that to rotate the points. –  Donnie May 12 '14 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

glRotatef assumes that the angle is in degrees. sin and cos assumes it to be in radians. You can adapt your function as follows:

void RotateFigure(tNo *iniList, float angle)
{
    float radians = angle * 3.1415926f / 180.0f; 
    float sine = sin(radians);
    float cosine = cos(radians);        

    for(tNo *p = iniList->prox; p != NULL; p = p->prox)
    {
        float oldX = p->x, oldY = p->y;
        p->x = oldX * cosine - oldY * sine;
        p->y = oldX * sine + oldY * cosine;
    }

    glutPostRedisplay();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hm, nice point (= –  Guilherme Agostinelli May 12 '14 at 21:30

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