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I have a list containing data as such:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]

I'd like to print out the ranges of consecutive integers:

1-4, 7-8, 10-14

Is there a built-in/fast/efficient way of doing this?

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1  
Homework? You show us what you've tried and we'll see if we can do better. –  John Machin Mar 2 '10 at 9:16
    
Thank you, I should have found that before asking :/ –  James Mar 2 '10 at 9:18
    
no problem, it wasn't that easy to find - I just happen to remember seeing it. Your question isn't an exact duplicate, since your desired output is a bit different. –  Dominic Rodger Mar 2 '10 at 9:20
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5 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

From the docs:

>>> data = [ 1, 4,5,6, 10, 15,16,17,18, 22, 25,26,27,28]
>>> for k, g in groupby(enumerate(data), lambda (i,x):i-x):
...     print map(itemgetter(1), g)
...
[1]
[4, 5, 6]
[10]
[15, 16, 17, 18]
[22]
[25, 26, 27, 28]

You can adapt this fairly easily to get a printed set of ranges.

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Don't forget to import itertools. Also, this only works with Python 2.4 and higher. –  Gabe Mar 2 '10 at 9:48
1  
actually you'll need from itertools import * and from operator import * (or equivalent), at least in Python 2.6. –  Andre Holzner Apr 11 '11 at 11:12
6  
Don't use star imports! Never use star imports! Use from itertools import groupby and from operator import itemgetter instead. –  Danilo Bargen Aug 28 '13 at 20:41
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Built-In: No, as far as I'm aware.

You have to run through the array. Start off with putting the first value in a variable and print it, then as long as you keep hitting the next number do nothing but remember the last number in another variable. If the next number is not in line, check the last number remembered versus the first number. If it's the same, do nothing. If it's different, print "-" and the last number. Then put the current value in the first variable and start over. At the end of the array you run the same routine as if you had hit a number out of line.

I could have written the code, of course, but I don't want to spoil your homework :-)

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This will print exactly as you specified:

>>> nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]
>>> ranges = sum((list(t) for t in zip(nums, nums[1:]) if t[0]+1 != t[1]), [])
>>> iranges = iter(nums[0:1] + ranges + nums[-1:])
>>> print ', '.join([str(n) + '-' + str(next(iranges)) for n in iranges])
1-4, 7-8, 10-14

If the list has any single number ranges, they would be shown as n-n:

>>> nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18]
>>> ranges = sum((list(t) for t in zip(nums, nums[1:]) if t[0]+1 != t[1]), [])
>>> iranges = iter(nums[0:1] + ranges + nums[-1:])
>>> print ', '.join([str(n) + '-' + str(next(iranges)) for n in iranges])
1-5, 7-9, 12-12, 15-18
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Here is another basic solution without using any module, which is good for interview, generally in the interview they asked without using any modules:

#!/usr/bin/python

def split_list(n):
    """will return the list index"""
    return [(x+1) for x,y in zip(n, n[1:]) if y-x != 1]

def get_sub_list(my_list):
    """will split the list base on the index"""
    my_index = split_list(my_list)
    output = list()
    prev = 0
    for index in my_index:
        new_list = [ x for x in my_list[prev:] if x < index]
        output.append(new_list)
        prev += len(new_list)
    output.append([ x for x in my_list[prev:]])
    return output

my_list = [1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14]
print get_sub_list(my_list)

Output:

[[1], [3, 4], [7, 8], [10, 11], [13, 14]]
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Another option (python3) to do this without importing additional modules is to find the "breaks" first, then extract the consecutive integers from break to break. (after adding an initial- and closing break)

l = [1,2,3,5,6,7,9,10,20]

# add a final break:
l = l+[l[-1]+2] 
# find breaks, add a preceding break
breaks = [0]+[i for i in range(1, len(l)) if not l[i-1] == l[i]-1]
# extract consecutives
consecutives = [l[breaks[i]:breaks[i+1]] for i in range(0, len(breaks)-1)]

print(consecutives)
> [[1, 2, 3], [5, 6, 7], [9, 10], [20]]
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