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I thought that we can redeclare a name any times in any context. But

class A 
{
    static int a;
    static int a;
};

returns a compile-time error:

test.cpp:4:13: error: redeclaration of ‘int A::a’
test.cpp:3:13: note: previous declaration ‘int A::a’

What names can be redeclare actually?

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Wasn´t this answered some minutes ago in you previous question? –  deviantfan May 13 at 7:32
    
how do you make the difference between the first and the second a ? –  Raxvan May 13 at 7:33
    
@Raxvan I'm interested in where this redeclaration denied in the standard. Can you answer me? –  St.Antario May 13 at 7:34
2  
@deviantfan It is two defferents questions. –  St.Antario May 13 at 7:37
    
@St.Antario: Not really, the are only the other way around and should get the same answer. See Mike Seymours comment: stackoverflow.com/questions/23624844/… –  deviantfan May 13 at 7:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C++11 9.2/1 [class.mem]

A member shall not be declared twice in the member-specification, except that a nested class or member class template can be declared and then later defined, and except that an enumeration can be introduced with an opaque-enum-declaration and later redeclared with an enum-specifier.

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Thanks. That is what I'm looking for. –  St.Antario May 13 at 7:43

According to the C++ Standard (9.2 Class members, paragraph #1)

A member shall not be declared twice in the member-specification, except that a nested class or member class template can be declared and then later defined, and except that an enumeration can be introduced with an opaque-enum-declaration and later redeclared with an enum-specifier.

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Beside the other answers, your code is not only a redeclaration but also a redefinition, which clearly violates the one-definition-rule.

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There is no any redefinition. Actually, declaration is a definition unless it declares a function without specifying the function’s body (8.4), it contains the extern specifier (7.1.1) or a linkage-specification 25 (7.5) and neither an initializer nor a function-body, it declares a static data member in a class definition (9.2, 9.4) –  St.Antario May 13 at 7:50
    
For more details please see 3.1.2 section –  St.Antario May 13 at 7:50
    
You're right. I've read too quickly and missed that you define a class not a function. –  bjhend May 13 at 7:59

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