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At first, I wrote the code below (I know the code is bad, but just for testing):

#include <stdio.h>

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    printf("%d", ints[-44]); //ints[-552] will not encounter segmentfault in my machine
}

the memory address of ints in my machine is 0x600840, and in my machine the size of a memory page is 4096 bytes, thus, the memory address between 0x600000 and 0x600fff is readable, so I it will not encounter segmentfault until ints[-553] (552 * 4 == 0x840).

However, when I change the code to below one:

#include <stdio.h>

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    ints[-44] = 0; 
}

at this time, segmentfault will occurs when using the statement ints[-512] = 0, but in the first version of code, printf("%d", ints[-512]) will not encounter segmentfault.

My question is what causes this? and how could I determine the threshold that will cause segmentfault when using ints[threshold + 1] = 0 while ints[threshold] will not cause segmentfault?

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3  
@JeffRSon YOu can't rely on it is right. But a race condition is about timing. Something completey different than this one. –  glglgl May 13 '14 at 8:23
1  
@JeffRSon, glglgl is pointing out that timing is not the issue here. Talking about race conditions here is unnecessarily confusing. –  Timothy Jones May 13 '14 at 8:29
    
There's an article here about why some out-of-bounds accesses don't segfault –  Matt McNabb May 13 '14 at 8:52
1  
You cannot expect any consistency in manifestations of undefined behavior. Having two different programs with UB doesn't help here either. You could infer something (not very reliably) if all your tests were made with the same executable file. –  n.m. May 13 '14 at 8:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Reading is another operation than writing. The page before the writable data segment might be read-only. Let's have a look.

I modified your first program this way:

#include <stdio.h>

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    printf("%d", ints[-44]); //ints[-552] will not encounter segmentfault in my machine
    close((int)&ints);
    sleep(100);
}

so that in the strace output the address will become evident. I ran it and got 134520896 which is 0x804a040. Having a look at /proc/<pid>/maps reveals

08048000-08049000 r-xp 00000000 00:21 5275899    /tmp/a
08049000-0804a000 r--p 00000000 00:21 5275899    /tmp/a
0804a000-0804b000 rw-p 00001000 00:21 5275899    /tmp/a
...

i. e. the address is 64 bytes behind the start of that page. The memory before that is read-only.

If I do the same with the 2nd program:

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    close((int)&ints);
    ints[-44] = 0;
    sleep(100);
}

I get 134520896 = 0x804a040 as well.

The map is the same as above:

08048000-08049000 r-xp 00000000 00:21 5277100    /tmp/b
08049000-0804a000 r--p 00000000 00:21 5277100    /tmp/b
0804a000-0804b000 rw-p 00001000 00:21 5277100    /tmp/b
...

An offset of -44, counted in ints, reduces the address by 44 * sizeof(int), i. e. 176 = 0xb0, which leads me to 0x804a040-0xb0 = 0x8049f80, which lies in the read-only area 08049000-0804a000. Reading this does not cause any sefgault, but writing does.

Under the given circumstances, I shouldn't get a segfault until ints[-2064], as this has an address of 0x8048000. But as you might have a different compiler, library, settings etc. than me, you might encounter other limits. And as you know, with undefined behaviour, you'll never be safe.

But let's test that as well:

In order to avoid using printf(), which might change segment sizes, I do

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    int i = 0;
    while (1) {
        i--;
        close(i);
        close((int)&ints[i]);
        ints[i] = ints[i];
    }
}

and have a look at the strace output, which reads

close(-15)                              = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(134520836)                        = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(-16)                              = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(134520832)                        = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(-17)                              = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(134520828)                        = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
--- SIGSEGV {si_signo=SIGSEGV, si_code=SEGV_ACCERR, si_addr=0x8049ffc} ---
+++ killed by SIGSEGV +++

where 134520832 = 0x804a000 and 134520828 = 0x8049ffc. I may not write -> SIGSEGV.

If I just read:

int ints[20] = {10, 20};
int main()
{
    int i = 0; int j;
    while (1) {
        i--;
        close(i);
        close((int)&ints[i]);
        j = ints[i];
    }
}

I indeed get until

close(-2064)                            = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(134512640)                        = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(-2065)                            = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
close(134512636)                        = -1 EBADF (Bad file descriptor)
--- SIGSEGV {si_signo=SIGSEGV, si_code=SEGV_MAPERR, si_addr=0x8047ffc} ---
+++ killed by SIGSEGV +++
Speicherzugriffsfehler

where 134512640 = 0x8048000 and 134512636 = 0x8047ffc. This is outside my mapped memory and I even am disallowed to read.

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Thank you so much, this answer really helps! –  Charles0429 May 13 '14 at 9:38

Reading and writing outside the bounds of memory you have allocated is undefined behaviour. Invoking this undefined behaviour usually (but not always) results in a segfault. However, you can't be sure that a segfault will happen.

The wikipedia link explains it quite nicely:

When an instance of undefined behavior occurs, so far as the language specification is concerned anything could happen, maybe nothing at all.

So, in this case, you could get a segfault, the program could abort, or sometimes it could just run fine. Or, anything. There is no way of guaranteeing the result.

You asked:

how could I determine the threshold that will cause segmentfault?

Since ints is an array of 20 items, the only indexes where you can be sure a segfault wont happen are 0-19. You can't write code that you are certain will trigger a segmentation fault across systems. This link explains it quite well:

— Macro: int SIGSEGV

This signal is generated when a program tries to read or write outside the memory that is allocated for it, or to write memory that can only be read. (Actually, the signals only occur when the program goes far enough outside to be detected by the system's memory protection mechanism.) The name is an abbreviation for “segmentation violation”.

Common ways of getting a SIGSEGV condition include dereferencing a null or uninitialized pointer, or when you use a pointer to step through an array, but fail to check for the end of the array. It varies among systems whether dereferencing a null pointer generates SIGSEGV or SIGBUS.

(emphasis added)

share|improve this answer
    
but when considering using printf("%d", ints[index]) case, I could compute that when index is between -552 and 0, it will not segfault. while when using 'ints[index] = 0', I could not compute it out. –  Charles0429 May 13 '14 at 8:28
1  
Ah, but you can't be sure that it won't segfault within those values. Since behaviour varies between systems/compilers etc. Accessing indexes outside of 0-19 causes "undefined behaviour": you can't know what will happen. –  Timothy Jones May 13 '14 at 8:31
    
@Charles0429 By knowing that programs acquire memory from the system in 4096 byte pages in your operating system you knew that part of memory was assigned to your process. Apparantly, ints[-44] has been marked read-only. Knowing why it has been marked read-only probably requires intimate knowledge on how your compiler/linker sets up memory when the program is executed. –  Klas Lindbäck May 13 '14 at 8:42
    
@KlasLindbäck If you can gather the addresses and can have a look on the memory maps, you can derive why the system behaves as it does. –  glglgl May 13 '14 at 8:47

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