Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have got difficulties to find an efficient solution to find indices in Python lists. All the solutions I have tested so far are slower than the 'find' function in MATLAB. I have only just started to use Python (therefore, I am not very experienced).

In MATLAB I would use the following:

a = linspace(0, 1000, 1000); % monotonically increasing vector
b = 1000 * rand(1, 100); % 100 points I want to find in a
for i = 1 : numel(b)
    indices(i) = find(b(i) <= a, 1); % find the first index where b(i) <= a
end

If I use MATLAB's arrayfun() I can speed this process up a little bit. In Python I tried several possibilities. I used

for i in xrange(0, len(b)):
   tmp = numpy.where(b[i] <= a)
   indices.append(tmp[0][0])

which takes a lot of time, especially if a is quite big. If b is sorted than I can use

for i in xrange(0, len(b)):
    if(b[curr_idx] <= a[i]):
        indices.append(i)
        curr_idx += 1
    if(curr_idx >= len(b)):
        return indices
        break

This is much quicker than the numpy.where() solution because I only have to search through the list a once, but this is still slower than the MATLAB solution.

Could anyone suggest a better / more efficient solution? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
The linspace(0, 1000, 1000) have 1000 elements changing from 0 to 1000 including both, giving a lot of floats, is that really what you want? On the other hand, the xrange works with integers. –  H.D. May 13 '14 at 10:24
    
numpy.where(b <= a)? No need to do that in a loop. –  M4rtini May 13 '14 at 10:30
    
@M4rtini, b <= a doesn't work for incompatible sizes (b has 100 and a has 1000 elements). He wants a process for each b[i], not a numpy.nonzero elementwise. –  H.D. May 13 '14 at 10:34
    
Yes, it is. I have to search through vectors (arrays, lists) which are consisting of floats. I basically want to find indices for a list of floats occurring in a (longer) list of floats if that makes sense. I am using xrange in this case only to go through every item of b, therefore integers are fine. –  xaneon May 13 '14 at 10:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try numpy.searchsorted:

>> a = np.array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7])
>> b = np.array([1, 2, 4, 3, 1, 0, 2, 9])
% sorting b "into" a
>> np.searchsorted(a, b, side='right')-1
array([1, 2, 4, 3, 1, 0, 2, 9])

You might have to apply a little special treatment for values in b, that are outside the range of a - such as the 9 in the above example. Despite that, this should be faster than any loop-based method.

As an aside: Similarly, histc in MATLAB will be much faster than the loop.

EDIT:

If you want the get the index where b is closest to a, you should be able to use the same code, simply with a modified a:

>> a_mod = 0.5*(a[:-1] + a[1:]) % take the centers between the elements in a
>> np.searchsorted(a_mod, np.array([0.9, 2.1, 4.2, 2.9, 1.1]), side='right')
array([1, 2, 4, 3, 1])

Note that you can drop the -1 since a_mod has one element less than a.

share|improve this answer
    
This is in fact the fastest solution I have tested so far. Quicker than all other possibilities in Python, but slower still a bit slower than find in matlab. If my array b would look like the following: b = np.array([0.9, 2.1, 4.2, 2.9, 1.1]), is there a way to find the indices where b[i]is closest to one item in a? The output for a case like this using your example above for a should be [1, 2, 4, 3, 1]. Is this possible? –  xaneon May 13 '14 at 11:38
1  
In fact I cant imagine that this is slower than the numel(b) loops in MATLAB...sure? °° –  sebastian May 13 '14 at 11:48
    
See my edit for the second "use case". –  sebastian May 13 '14 at 11:55
    
a = array([ 0. , 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7]) ; b = array([ 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.3, 0.1, 0. , 0.2, 0.9]) ; np.searchsorted(a, b, side='right') - 1 resulted in array([1, 2, 4, 3, 1, 0, 2, 7]), but 0.9 > 0.7. What happens when max(b) > max(a)? –  H.D. May 13 '14 at 12:03
2  
np.searchsorted is about 2x faster in the current development branch of numpy than it is in 1.8, so if you can compile your own numpy, or wait a couple of weeks until numpy 1.9 is released, Python may be in the lead again. –  Jaime May 13 '14 at 13:50

With numpy only for number generation (not for vectorization):

import numpy as np
a = np.linspace(0, 1000, 1000)
b = 1000 * np.random.rand(100)
indices = [next(i for i, ai in enumerate(a) if bi <= ai) for bi in b]

This works if a.max() >= b.max() as in the example, otherwise will raise a StopIteration, and it's still slow (although this one doesn't make every possible comparison like in b(i) <= a).

If you need the indices as an array instead of a list, use np.array(indices) after that. If you need some optimization, you can sort b and keep only one enumerate(a), peeking instead of taking the last element.

You can also try without numpy on pypy:

def igen(a, b):
    iterb = iter(b)
    bi = next(iterb)
    for i, ai in enumerate(a):
        while bi <= ai:
            yield i
            bi = next(iterb)
    i += 1 # Last bi are bigger than all ai
    yield i
    for unused in iterb:
        yield i

from random import random
a = (i * 1000. / 999. for i in xrange(43032500))
b = sorted(random() * 1000 for unused in xrange(3848))
indices = list(igen(a, b))

This one is based on generators using that idea, and b should be sorted. This will return len(a) when bi > ai for all ai.

For testing, I'm using:

setup = """
from random import random

def igen(a, b):
    iterb = iter(b)
    bi = next(iterb)
    for i, ai in enumerate(a):
        while bi <= ai:
            yield i
            bi = next(iterb)
    i += 1 # Last bi are bigger than all ai
    yield i
    for unused in iterb:
        yield i
"""

program = """
a = (i * 1000. / 999. for i in xrange(43032500))
b = sorted(random() * 1000 for unused in xrange(3848))
indices = list(igen(a, b))
"""

# Python 2 and 3 compatibility
import sys
if sys.version_info.major == 3:
    program = program.replace("xrange", "range")

# Time it! =)
from timeit import timeit
print(timeit(program, setup, number=5000))

That means I'm running 5 thousand times that algorithm in each environment. The resulting time is the SUM of all trials (program) duration (not the mean value):

  • On CPython 3.4.0 result was 11.491293527011294 (seconds)
  • On CPython 2.7.6 result was 9.39319992065 (seconds)
  • On Pypy 2.2.1 result was 3.31203603745 (seconds)

More specific version messages:

  • Python 3.4.0 (default, Apr 11 2014, 13:05:11) [GCC 4.8.2] on linux
  • Python 2.7.6 (default, Mar 22 2014, 22:59:56) [GCC 4.8.2] on linux2
  • Python 2.7.3 (2.2.1+dfsg-1, Nov 28 2013, 05:13:10) [PyPy 2.2.1 with GCC 4.8.2] on linux2

Now the same with the "two ifs" version adapted (code below) had the results:

  • On CPython 3.4.0 result was 13.03860338096274 (seconds)
  • On CPython 2.7.6 result was 10.7371659279 (seconds)
  • On Pypy 2.2.1 result was 2.88891601562 (seconds)

Pypy found a way to optimize your version but still have one difference, I've tested this one calculating "a" just once, while my version calculated "a" 5000 times. The code I've run was:

setup = """
from random import random
a = [i * 1000. / 999. for i in xrange(43032500)]
"""

program = """
b = sorted(random() * 1000 for unused in xrange(3848))
curr_idx = 0
indices = []
for i in xrange(len(a)): # Why not for i, ai in enumerate(a)?
    if b[curr_idx] <= a[i]:
        indices.append(i)
        curr_idx += 1
    if curr_idx >= len(b):
        break
"""

# Python 2 and 3 compatibility
import sys
if sys.version_info.major == 3:
    setup = setup.replace("xrange", "range")
    program = program.replace("xrange", "range")

# Time it! =)
from timeit import timeit
print(timeit(program, setup, number=5000))

Another version would just put the a assignment to the program instead of keeping it on the setup, doing so the Pypy time goes to 2102.06863689 (yeah, more than 35 minutes). Storing things on a huge list is really slow. Changing the program beginning to:

a = (i * 1000. / 999. for i in xrange(43032500)) # A generator expression
[...]
for i, ai in enumerate(a):
    if b[curr_idx] <= ai:
    [...]

Brings us back to 3.11599397659 seconds with Pypy. On this version, a is created 5000 times, but never stored on a list. On the other hand, the igen version "hardcoded" outside of the function worked on 3.17516112328 seconds, in which setup just imported random and program was:

a = (i * 1000. / 999. for i in xrange(43032500))
b = sorted(random() * 1000 for unused in xrange(3848))
indices = []
iterb = iter(b)
try:
    bi = next(iterb)
    for i, ai in enumerate(a):
        while bi <= ai:
            indices.append(i)
            bi = next(iterb)
except StopIteration:
    pass
else:
    i += 1 # Last bi are bigger than all ai
    indices.append(i)
    for unused in iterb:
        indices.append(i)

Anyhow, let A = len(a) and B = len(b), so these are O[A + B.log(B)] algorithms (including @sebastian solution with np.searchsorted). On the other hand, calculating bi <= ai for all pairs (bi, ai) is O[b * a], the Matlab solution should be asymptotically slower unless it does some internal optimization to avoid full comparison making each statement completely lazy (but I don't have Matlab to verify =/). As a need for a comparison, I did this on GNU Octave:

start = time;
a = linspace(0, 1000, 43032500);
b = 1000 * rand(1, 3848);
for i = 1 : numel(b)
    indices(i) = find(b(i) <= a, 1);
end
stop = time;

stop - start

That's one time the process Python did 5000 times, using the original code from this question, and it happened in 203.16 seconds (more than 3 minutes).

Oh, but you're cheating! Put that "start = time;" after the assignment to "a"!

Ok, no one said that, but I've just tried such change. As every b(i) <= a is a vector with size 43032500, it doesn't change much: 202.83 seconds.

And Numpy?!

Numpy also have to store the data. Mostly, it doesn't work with generators (hstack and vstack are exceptions). But we can't be sure which is fasterwithout empirical evidence. Let's run this with Numpy 1.8.1:

setup = """
import numpy as np
a = np.linspace(0., 1000., 43032500) # Don't count this time
"""

program = """
b = 1000 * np.random.rand(3848)
indices = np.searchsorted(a, b, side='right') - 1 # From @sebastian solution
indices[b > a[-1]] = len(a) # Big value correction (my improvement)
"""

# Time it! =)
from timeit import timeit
print(timeit(program, setup, number=5000))
  • On CPython 2.7, 9.81494688988 seconds
  • On CPython 3.4, 9.831143222982064 seconds

And that's it. =)

share|improve this answer
1  
The dimensions of the arrays do not match. You also are not taking advantage of numpy broadcasting. –  Reblochon Masque May 13 '14 at 10:49
1  
Yes, the dimensions don't match, but who said they should match? –  H.D. May 13 '14 at 10:52
    
Hummm, maybe I did not understand the question precisely then. –  Reblochon Masque May 13 '14 at 11:05
    
@H.D. Thank you. This solution does what I want, but I just tested it with len(a) = 43032500 and len(b) = 3848 and the solution I posted with the if conditions and increasing current index is much faster. Both solutions still much slower than the MATLAB find function. –  xaneon May 13 '14 at 11:06
    
The first solution was still slow, but it should already be faster than the MATLAB one that makes several unnecessary comparisons. Now there's another solution, and this one should be at least as fast as the one with the if conditions. –  H.D. May 13 '14 at 12:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.