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From a .c file of another guy, I saw this:

const float c = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;

where he wants to avoid the computation of sqrt(1/2).

Can this be really stored somehow with plain C/C++? I mean without loosing precision. It seems impossible to me.

I am using C++, but I do not believe that precision difference between this two languages are too big (if any), that' why I did not test it.

So, I wrote these few lines, to have a look at the behaviour of the code:

std::cout << "Number:    0.70710678118654752440084436210485\n";

const float f = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;
std::cout << "float:     " << std::setprecision(32) << f << std::endl;

const double d = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485; // no f extension
std::cout << "double:    " << std::setprecision(32) << d << std::endl;

const double df = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;
std::cout << "doublef:   " << std::setprecision(32) << df << std::endl;

const long double ld = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485;
std::cout << "l double:  " << std::setprecision(32) << ld << std::endl;

const long double ldl = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485l; // l suffix!
std::cout << "l doublel: " << std::setprecision(32) << ldl << std::endl;

The output is this:

                   *       ** ***
                   v        v v
Number:    0.70710678118654752440084436210485    // 32 decimal digits
float:     0.707106769084930419921875            // 24 >>      >>
double:    0.70710678118654757273731092936941
doublef:   0.707106769084930419921875            // same as float
l double:  0.70710678118654757273731092936941    // same as double
l doublel: 0.70710678118654752438189403651592    // suffix l

where * is the last accurate digit of float, ** the last accurate digit of double and *** the last accurate digit of long double.

The output of double has 32 decimal digits, since I have set the precision of std::cout at that value.

float output has 24, as expected, as said here:

float has 24 binary bits of precision, and double has 53.

I would expect the last output to be the same with the pre-last, i.e. that the f suffix would not prevent the number from becoming a double. I think that when I write this:

const double df = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;

what happens is that first the number becomes a float one and then stored as a double, so after the 24th decimal digits, it has zeroes and that's why the double precision stops there.

Am I correct?

From this answer I found some relevant information:

float x = 0 has an implicit typecast from int to float.
float x = 0.0f does not have such a typecast.
float x = 0.0 has an implicit typecast from double to float.

[EDIT]

About __float128, it is not standard, thus it's out of the competition. See more here.

share|improve this question
2  
You miss one type: long double. –  Joachim Pileborg May 13 at 10:49
1  
Once you use a base-representation for sqrt(1/2), you lose precision in any case!!! –  barak manos May 13 at 10:51
    
Try long double, it is extended double Precision (80 to 96 bits wide) –  Don't You Worry Child May 13 at 10:51
    
You can easily store them as text. What do you need this for? Maybe you need some high precision float library? –  zch May 13 at 10:53
1  
@Don'tYouWorryChild long double is 80 bits on x86, after padding it becomes 96 bits on x86 and maybe 128 bits on x86_64, so the remaining bits have no significance –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc May 13 at 14:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the standard:

There are three floating point types: float, double, and long double. The type double provides at least as much precision as float, and the type long double provides at least as much precision as double. The set of values of the type float is a subset of the set of values of the type double; the set of values of the type double is a subset of the set of values of the type long double. The value representation of floating-point types is implementation-defined.

So you can see your issue with this question: the standard doesn't actually say how precise floats are.

In terms of standard implementations, you need to look at IEEE754, which means the other two answers from Irineau and Davidmh are perfectly valid approaches to the problem.

As to suffix letters to indicate type, again looking at the standard:

The type of a floating literal is double unless explicitly specified by a suffix. The suffixes f and F specify float, the suffixes l and L specify long double.

So your attempt to create a long double will just have the same precision as the double literal you are assigning to it unless you use the L suffix.

I understand that some of these answers may not seem satisfactory, but there is a lot of background reading to be done on the relevant standards before you can dismiss answers. This answer is already longer than intended so I won't try and explain everything here.

And as a final note: Since the precision is not clearly defined, why not have a constant that's longer than it needs to be? Seems to make sense to always define a constant that is precise enough to always be representable regardless of type.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know they were called suffixes. Nice explanation. So, you mean that they original author of that long number, did that so that he can use as mush precision as possible in the corresponding system?? "before you can dismiss answers." I did not downvoted any of the answers. I can not test the first one and I am waiting for a reply to my comment and the python one didn't mention that same stand for C. So, I think I didn't dismiss any answer. –  G. Samaras May 13 at 12:50
    
@G.Samaras, yes. It's a good idea for a number of reasons: Firstly (as mentioned above) you don't actually know the precision (though in practice it's nearly always the same). Secondly, if you wanted to change the code in the future to use a different data type, then your constants would still be valid. –  Matt May 13 at 13:00
    
I think that the answered would improve if you would write this comment in your answer. I am upvoting, thanks. –  G. Samaras May 13 at 13:03
    
+1 for good answer. Note: I agree in general about "why not have a constant that's longer than it needs to be?", but there is flaw here. The constant given, though certainly good for the classic 32-bit float (binary32), and 64-bit double (binary64), it falls about 2-3 decimal digits short for a binary128. It's easy to look at this code a say "looks good for a long double - it has lots of digits", when it is lacking. –  chux May 13 at 14:11
    
(cont) Better to size to the consonant's type precision (+ 3 decimal digits) or to the next larger type (+ 3 decimal digits), but to paste lots of digits (which happens to be correct to the next typical precision minus 3 digits) is a problem laying in the weeds. –  chux May 13 at 14:11

Some compilers have an implementation of the binary128 floating point format, normalized by IEEE 754-2008. Using gcc, for example, the type is __float128. That floating point format have about 34 decimal precision (log(2^113)/log(10)).

You can use the Boost Multiprecision library, to use their wrapper float128. That implementation will either use native types, if available, or use a drop-in replacement.

Let's extend your experiment with that new non-standard type __float128, with a recent g++ (4.8):

// Compiled with g++ -Wall -lquadmath essai.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <quadmath.h>
#include <sstream>

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, __float128 f) {
  char buf[200];
  std::ostringstream format;
  format << "%." << (std::min)(190L, out.precision()) << "Qf";
  quadmath_snprintf(buf, 200, format.str().c_str(), f);
  out << buf;
  return out;
}

int main() {
  std::cout.precision(32);
  std::cout << "Number:    0.70710678118654752440084436210485\n";

  const float f = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;
  std::cout << "float:     " << std::setprecision(32) << f << std::endl;

  const double d = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485; // no f extension
  std::cout << "double:    " << std::setprecision(32) << d << std::endl;

  const double df = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f;
  std::cout << "doublef:   " << std::setprecision(32) << df << std::endl;

  const long double ld = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485;
  std::cout << "l double:  " << std::setprecision(32) << ld << std::endl;

  const long double ldl = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485l; // l suffix!
  std::cout << "l doublel: " << std::setprecision(32) << ldl << std::endl;

  const __float128 f128 = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485;
  const __float128 f128f = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f; // f suffix
  const __float128 f128l = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485l; // l suffix
  const __float128 f128q = 0.70710678118654752440084436210485q; // q suffix

  std::cout << "f128:      " << f128 << std::endl;
  std::cout << "f f128:    " << f128f << std::endl;
  std::cout << "l f128:    " << f128l << std::endl;
  std::cout << "q f128:    " << f128q << std::endl;
}

The output is:

                   *       ** ***        ****
                   v        v v             v
Number:    0.70710678118654752440084436210485
float:     0.707106769084930419921875
double:    0.70710678118654757273731092936941
doublef:   0.707106769084930419921875
l double:  0.70710678118654757273731092936941
l doublel: 0.70710678118654752438189403651592
f128:      0.70710678118654757273731092936941
f f128:    0.70710676908493041992187500000000
l f128:    0.70710678118654752438189403651592
q f128:    0.70710678118654752440084436210485

where * is the last accurate digit of float, ** the last accurate digit of double, *** the last accurate digit of long double, and **** is the last accurate digit of __float128.

As said by another answer, the C++ standard does not say what is the precision of the various floating point types (like it does not says what is the size of the integral types). It only specifies minimal precision/size of those types. But the norm IEEE754 does specify all that! The FPU of all lot of architectures does implement that norm IEEE745, and the recent versions of gcc implement the type binary128 of the norm with the extension __float128.

As for the explanation of your code, or mine, an expression like 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f is a floating-point literal. It has a type, that is defined by its suffix, here f for float. And thus the value of the literal correspond to the nearest value of the given type from the given number. That explains why, for example, the precision of "doublef" is the same as for "float", in your code. In recent gcc versions, there is an extension, that allows to define floating-point literals of type __float128, with the Q suffix (Quadruple-precision).

share|improve this answer
    
See my edit. I can not print the __float128, since std::cout says ambiguous overload for ‘operator<<’. Moreover, even if we print it (stackoverflow.com/questions/5451447/… also did not help) and even if it achieves the exact precision, I would really like to understand what happens with my experiments above. –  G. Samaras May 13 at 12:38
    
To be honest, I would really like to print it, so that I can augment my analysis above. If we achieve that, I think that this answer deserves at least a +1. –  G. Samaras May 13 at 13:05
1  
In addition to the storage of the floating-point value itself, you have another problem: how to specify a literal initializer that has enough precision to provide all of the desired digits. If you're using C++11, you can implement this using user-defined literals. I'm not sure if Boost.Multiprecision has added this capability yet. –  Jason R May 13 at 13:12
    
binary128 has 113 bit precision, yet the constant 0.70710678118654752440084436210485f; only provides ~106 bits. Should this code be used with such FP numbers, it could easily be a difficult bug to catch early on in development. –  chux May 13 at 13:48
2  
@chux even if you provide more than enough precision, with f suffix it'll be truncated down to 24 bits like float, not 106 bits –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc May 13 at 14:54

Python's numerical library, numpy, has a very convenient float info function. All the types are the equivalent to C:

For C's float:

print numpy.finfo(numpy.float32)
Machine parameters for float32
---------------------------------------------------------------------
precision=  6   resolution= 1.0000000e-06
machep=   -23   eps=        1.1920929e-07
negep =   -24   epsneg=     5.9604645e-08
minexp=  -126   tiny=       1.1754944e-38
maxexp=   128   max=        3.4028235e+38
nexp  =     8   min=        -max
---------------------------------------------------------------------

For C's double:

print numpy.finfo(numpy.float64)
Machine parameters for float64
---------------------------------------------------------------------
precision= 15   resolution= 1.0000000000000001e-15
machep=   -52   eps=        2.2204460492503131e-16
negep =   -53   epsneg=     1.1102230246251565e-16
minexp= -1022   tiny=       2.2250738585072014e-308
maxexp=  1024   max=        1.7976931348623157e+308
nexp  =    11   min=        -max
---------------------------------------------------------------------

And for C's long float:

print numpy.finfo(numpy.float128)
Machine parameters for float128
---------------------------------------------------------------------
precision= 18   resolution= 1e-18
machep=   -63   eps=        1.08420217249e-19
negep =   -64   epsneg=     5.42101086243e-20
minexp=-16382   tiny=       3.36210314311e-4932
maxexp= 16384   max=        1.18973149536e+4932
nexp  =    15   min=        -max
---------------------------------------------------------------------

So, not even long float (128 bits) will give you the 32 digits you want. But, do you really need them all?

share|improve this answer
1  
The decimal precision of quadruple precision is about 34. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadruple-precision_floating-point_format –  lrineau May 13 at 11:06
2  
@Davidmh: NumPy's float128 doesn't necessarily correspond to long double in C. There is no specification on the number of bits that long double uses. On many (not all) x86 platforms, it uses the 80-bit extended precision mode provided by its FPU. There's certainly no specification that states that it provides quadruple precision. So, drawing conclusions based on NumPy's (admittedly useful) analysis of its float128 type's precision is fruitless. With that said, the parameters reported for its "128-bit" data type look more like what you would expect from 80 bits. –  Jason R May 13 at 13:06
2  
@Davidmh: There is no such type as long float in C. –  Jason R May 13 at 13:22
1  
There is no long float in C. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_data_types –  G. Samaras May 13 at 13:47
1  
This information titled "For C's float:", "For C's double:", etc. is misleading. This data represent a sample C's floating point characteristics. These characteristics differ between C machines. The C specification does not define these values as shown. –  chux May 13 at 13:52

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