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I'm using the iOS-ntp framework and I'm getting a weird behavior that I cannot understand. Currently its 13:14 but I changed the time on the device to 13:34 when I make the folioing calls:

NSDate *deviceDate = [NSDate date];
[NetworkClock sharedNetworkClock];
NSDate *networkDate = [NSDate networkDate];
NSLog(@"deviceDate  =%@", deviceDate);
NSLog(@"networkDate =%@", networkDate);

What I get is:

deviceDate  =2014-05-13 13:34:37
networkDate =2014-05-13 13:34:38

Obviously I expected:

deviceDate  =2014-05-13 13:34:37
networkDate =2014-05-13 13:14:38

How am I getting the same date value?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Snooping the connection I intercepted this packet from the server to the app:

Network Time Protocol (NTP Version 3, server)

Reference ID: 212.82.32.15

Reference Timestamp: May 16, 2014 14:56:40.999638000 UTC

Origin Timestamp: May 16, 2014 18:25:02.688373000 UTC

Receive Timestamp: May 16, 2014 15:15:14.862829000 UTC

Transmit Timestamp: May 16, 2014 15:15:14.862889000 UTC

After this the framework call returns 18:25

share|improve this question
    
Try to disable 'set automatically' in 'date & time' preferences of your device. –  jamapag May 13 at 12:05
    
Just a wild guess, but it probably hasn't received any NTP responses yet, and so the offset is 0. You should give it at least 30 seconds before considering it as having started up. –  Petesh May 13 at 13:52
    
@jamapag it is disabled. –  Reonarudo May 13 at 14:17
    
@Petesh if that was true 1 min later the result should be different, and it isn't. But I'll try making several requests with 30 seconds difference. –  Reonarudo May 13 at 14:19
    
You are making sure that the ntp.hosts file is properly propagated into your app? If it's not then the framework simply doesn't do anything. In addition, it's using an available NTP server? –  Petesh May 13 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit It turns out that the lack of the config file was not the problem in this case. Please read further.

There is logic in the algorithm to decide that certain time stamps are invalid; this is used to determine if the time can be trusted. This decision is made by determining if the server clock was set less than 1 hour ago. It uses your current time as the reference point.

When I skew my clock forward by a couple of hours (and I'm currently in UTC+1 (Summer Time)), I never get a sync, because this time will always be out by at least a few hours, i.e. the test for this will never get a good value.

If you comment out the check that:

(-[[self dateFromNetworkTime:&ntpServerBaseTime] timeIntervalSinceNow] < 3600.0)

in the evaluatePacket method NetAssociation.m, you avoid this check, and can get a wider degree of offsets. I've linked a github reference to the patch that accomplishes this in relation to the master.

Being unable to sync with NTP once your clock is significantly out of whack is what can be considered a safety feature, but because we're just using it to calculate the delta between the system clock and the network clock, it doesn't actually give us anything in this case

It's relatively poorly documented in the framework, but you need to copy the ntp.hosts file from the framework resources directory into the project that uses the framework, and ensure that the file is copied as part of the Copy Bundle Resources part of the app's Build Phases.

If you don't copy the file, the framework has no time references to use and so never determines the offset to use, resulting in the OS time at all times.

The cocoapods version of the framework doesn't use this configuration file, and instead has the method networkDateWithServer:(NSString *)server, which allows you to explicitly specify the NTP server to use.

The framework could probably react in a more appropriate manner (e.g. logging the lack of the file) rather than just carrying on, but that's a design decision.

share|improve this answer
    
The file is part of the Copy Bundle Resources section in Build Phases. –  Reonarudo May 15 at 19:25
    
And you've verified that the file is present in the app bundle of the resulting executable and contains a list of ntp servers that are accessible to the phone. I've this working perfectly with a dummy project running on an iPad Air & iPhone 5S having rebuilt the framework for 64bit. If you can, then snoop the traffic from the device, and verify that you're sending out NTP requests and receiving NTP responses –  Petesh May 15 at 19:33
    
I don't know how to locate the file inside the app bundle but I'll try your snooping advice. –  Reonarudo May 15 at 19:38
    
In XCode go to Products right-click on the app, Show in Finder, then right-click on the app in Finder and choose Show Package Contents. The ntp.hosts file should be present in the folder that is displayed, along with info.plist and other files. –  Petesh May 15 at 19:43
    
Yes, the file is definitely there. And the server is answering the following: Network Time Protocol (NTP Version 3, server) Reference ID: 212.82.32.15 Reference Timestamp: May 16, 2014 14:56:40.999638000 UTC Origin Timestamp: May 16, 2014 18:25:02.688373000 UTC Receive Timestamp: May 16, 2014 15:15:14.862829000 UTC Transmit Timestamp: May 16, 2014 15:15:14.862889000 UTC So everything looks good except that the framework is giving me the wrong result if queried every 30 seconds. –  Reonarudo May 16 at 15:18

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