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I would like to negate the result of a group of conditions separated ors in an if statement in a django template. Heres my code

{% if not (owner.home_number or owner.work_number or owner.mobile_number) %}
    No contact number available
{% endif %}

I am currently getting this error

TemplateSyntaxError: Could not parse the remainder: '(owner.home_number' from '(owner.home_number'

share|improve this question
    
Have you forgotten to add some closing quotes? (ref. this answer) – Steinar Lima May 13 '14 at 17:30
    
I dont think so... when I take out the parenthesis I dont get a syntax error. – Crystal May 13 '14 at 21:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since the order of evaluation is the following:

  • or
  • and
  • not

you can omit the parenthesis:

{% if not owner.home_number or owner.work_number or owner.mobile_number %}
    No contact number available
{% endif %}

Or, just FYI, you can also reverse the check:

{% if owner.home_number or owner.work_number or owner.mobile_number %}
{% else %}
    No contact number available
{% endif %}
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up doing this but I was wondering why the parenthesis doesnt work in django templating... – Crystal May 13 '14 at 21:28
    
@Crystal you cannot use parenthesis, it is not allowed by design. Consider accepting the answer if you think it deserves. Thanks. – alecxe May 13 '14 at 21:29
    
Thanks for pointing out the order of evaluation, I guess I assumed that the precedence was what I was used to (not being the first in the list)... this makes me wonder how I would negate a single condition in the group – Crystal May 13 '14 at 21:37

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