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The caller wants us to answer the following 64 questions:

is base prime? is base + 1 prime? is base + 2 prime? is base + 3 prime? ... is base + 63 prime?

The function is supposed to build and return a 64-bit unsigned long long where each bit holds the answer to the corresponding question: bit #k of the return value tells whether base + k is a prime number.

Not sure where I went wrong here. The function should output 0x820A00A08800228AULL but I'm getting the 10004514. I thought to start with the MSB and shift left would build it bit by bit.

int prime( unsigned long long n ){
    int a;

    for( a = 2; a<=sqrt((double)n); a++ ){
        if( n%a == 0 )
            return 0;
    }
    if( a == n )
        return 1;
}

unsigned long long setPrimeBits( unsigned long long base ){
    int a;
    unsigned long long b = 0x000000000000000ULL;

    for( a=63; a>=0; a-- ){
        if( prime( base+a ) ){
            b |= 1;
            b = b<<1;
        }//end if
        else b = b<<1;
    }//end for
    return b;
}

Main & output as follows...

int main(){
    printf( "%16X\n", setPrimeBits( 100 ));
}
        10004514
share|improve this question
4  
This is the perfect moment to start using a debugger! To not say "Not sure where I went wrong here." is a bad question, if ît even were a question at all. – alk May 13 '14 at 17:36
    
Starting with the MSB but you're shifting left as you iterate. Seems wrong. – Brian Cain May 13 '14 at 17:37
    
Your prime() is kind of brute forcey. – Jiminion May 13 '14 at 17:47
    
If using VS, add a breakpoint and then interrogate a value. Or put in a print statement. – Jiminion May 13 '14 at 17:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Your prime() function exhibits undefined behavior. If it doesn't find a prime, the final conditional will also be false (because a is near the sqrt(n), not near n), which means you will have no executed return statement. To fix this, Just return 1 if you complete the for loop (that is, you find no prime divisors).

  2. You want to print an unsigned long long. The format string for that is %016llX.

  3. You shift b one too many times. Let's assume the last loop of the for loop (computing a + 0) is prime. You'll write that to the bottom bit, and then move it over one place.

Fixing these errors, we get some code that looks like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int prime( unsigned long long n ){
    int a;

    for(a = 2; a<=sqrt((double)n); a++)
        if( n%a == 0 )
            return 0;

    return 1;
}

unsigned long long setPrimeBits( unsigned long long base ){
    int a;
    unsigned long long b = 0x000000000000000ULL;

    for(a = 63; a >= 0; a--) {
        b = b << 1;
        if(prime(base+a))
            b |= 1;
    }

    return b;
}

int main(){
    printf( "%16llX\n", setPrimeBits( 100 ));
}

Which, when run, reports:

[12:54pm][wlynch@watermelon /tmp] ./pr 
820A00A08800228A

And, because there seems to be confusion about the left-shifting in other answers, you could write an equivalent setPrimeBits() that looks like this:

unsigned long long setPrimeBits( unsigned long long base ){
    int a;
    unsigned long long b = 0x000000000000000ULL;

    for(a = 0; a < 64; a++)
        if (prime(base+a))
            b |= (1ULL << a);           

    return b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like prime() could just return with no particular value at all (fall out of the routine). That would give a random (?) or undefined value. – Jiminion May 13 '14 at 17:54
    
But when I tested it, it did work. I tested 121 and 0x198F5U. – seeholz May 13 '14 at 17:57
    
@seeholz: Your prime function has undefined behavior. It can appear to work, but that doesn't mean it will always work. The fix I've shown here removes the undefined behavior. – Bill Lynch May 13 '14 at 17:58
1  
sqrt((double)n) remains an issue. On a typical machine, the conversion to (double) will truncate to 53ish significant bits, but base is 64. Quick suggestion: unsigned long long limit = sqrt(n) + 1; for(a = 2; a<=limit; a++)`. May have to ponder this deeper. – chux May 13 '14 at 18:36
    
@chux: I imagine that seeholz could still satisfy the program requirements even if prime() only accepted unsigned arguments. – Bill Lynch May 13 '14 at 18:42

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