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I am learning JSON, but I found out that you can put what are called "hashes" into JSON as well? Where can I find out what a hash is? Or could you explain to me what a hash is? Also, what's a hashmap? I have experience in C++ and C#, and I am learning JS, Jquery, and JSON.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

A Hash is an array that uses arbitrary strings/objects (depending on the implementation, this varies across programming languages) rather than plain integers as keys.

In Javascript, any Object is technically a hash (also referred to as a Dictionary, Associative-Array, etc).

Examples:

 var myObj = {}; // Same as = new Object();
  myObj['foo'] = 'bar';

  var myArr = []; // Same as = new Array();
  myArr[0] = 'foo';
  myArr[1] = 'bar';
  myArr['blah'] = 'baz'; // This will work, but is not recommended.

Now, since JSON is basically using JS constructs and some strict guidelines to define portable data, the equivalent to myObj above would be:

{ "foo" : "bar" };

Hope this helps.

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wow that's it? I was overcomplicating things. –  Alex Mar 2 '10 at 15:43
    
A note about your last line: you can set properties on arrays as if they were objects--they are objects, and will act like objects in that case. –  skeggse Mar 28 '13 at 21:16
    
@CMC: thanks. Updated the answer. –  Lior Cohen Mar 28 '13 at 22:17

Hash = dictionary.

A hash:

{ "key1": "value1", "key2": "value2" }
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Here's an excellent article on hash tables, i.e. hash maps

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helpful article, thanks! –  Alex Mar 2 '10 at 15:44

I hash is a random looking number which is generated from a piece of data and always the same for the same input. For example if you download files from some websites they will provide a hash of the data so you can verify your download is not corrupted (which would change the hash). Another application of hashes is in a hash table (or hash map). This is a very fast associative data structure where the hashes are used to index into an array. std::unorderd_map in C++ is an example of this. You could store a hash in JSON as a string for example something like "AB34F553" and use this to verify data. JSON also supports dictionary type elements. People may refer to these as hash tables, but this would be technically incorrect as there is no particular data structure implementation associated with the JSON data itself.

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