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My post is organized in three sections:

1. My code
2. Example input and output
3. My three questions

MY CODE:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

void deleteTrash(char*, char*);

const int kStr = 2;
const int kStrLen = 3;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if (argc < 4) {
        cout << "Incorrect argument given." << endl;
        cout << "Try again." << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    cout << "PRINT argv[2]" << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(argv[2]); i++) {
       cout << "Iterator: " << i << endl;
       cout << argv[2][i] << endl;
    }

    char* inputString;
    deleteTrash(argv[kStr], inputString);

    cout << "PRINT inputString" << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(inputString); i++) {
        cout << i << endl;
        cout << inputString[i] << endl;
    }

    int strLen;
    stringstream num;
    num << argv[kStrLen];
    num >> strLen;

    if ( num.fail() ) {
        cout << "Incorrect argument given." << endl;
        cout << "Try again." << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    if ( strLen < sizeof(inputString) ) {
        cout << "Incorrect argument given." << endl;
        cout << "Try again." << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    return 0;
}

void deleteTrash(char* tempString, char* inputString) 
{
    int tempStringLen = sizeof(tempString);
    int newSize = 0;

    while (tempString[newSize] != '\0')
        newSize++;

    char newString[newSize + 1];

    int iterator = 0;

    while (tempString[iterator] != '\0') {
        newString[iterator] = tempString[iterator];
        iterator++;
    }

    newString[newSize] = '\0';

    cout << "PRINT newString" << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(newString); i++) {
        cout << newString[i] << endl;
    }   

    inputString = newString;

    cout << "PRINT inputString" << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(inputString); i++) {
        cout << "Iterator: " << i << endl;
        cout << inputString[i] << endl;
    }   

    return;
}

EXAMPLE INPUT:

./hw1q5 4 W# 3

OUTPUT:

PRINT argv[2]
-----
Iterator: 0
W
Iterator: 1
#
Iterator: 2

Iterator: 3
3
Iterator: 4

Iterator: 5
T
Iterator: 6
E
Iterator: 7
R
PRINT newString
-----
W
#

PRINT inputString
-----
Iterator: 0
W
Iterator: 1
#
Iterator: 2

Iterator: 3

Iterator: 4

Iterator: 5

Iterator: 6

Iterator: 7

PRINT inputString
-----
0
Segmentation fault: 11

MY QUESTIONS:

  1. Why does argv contain more than 3 elements (M, #, and \0). It prints out 8 elements (print statement iterates 0 - 7), which, after W, #, \0, are garbage. Should it not be printing only the 3 elements (M, #, and \0). Why is this happening? How may I fix it?
  2. Why is it that when I set newString (type char) to inputString (type char*), by doing inputString = newString, inputString iterates 8 time in the print statement, printing blanks after printing M, #, and \0.
  3. Why is the seg fault happening in the third statement?
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1  
sizeof(argv[2]) == sizeof(charÜ*) == sizeof(pointer) == constant –  Dieter Lücking May 14 '14 at 4:37

3 Answers 3

sizeof() does not return the length of a null-terminated character array string. Instead you need something like strlen().

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Let's just take one of the problems here:

// Wrong!
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
...
for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(argv[2]); i++) {
   cout << "Iterator: " << i << endl;
   cout << argv[2][i] << endl;
}

// Better
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
...
for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
   cout << "argv[" << i << "]: " << argv[i] << endl;
}

argv[] is an array of one or more "C" strings.

argc tells you how many strings are in the array.

You want to iterate through the strings in the array (argv[i]), not the characters in the string (for example, "argv[0][0]").

... AND ...

"sizeof(argv)" just gives you the size of a pointer (4 bytes, for a 32-bit CPU). It does NOT give you the #/elements in the array. That's what "argc" is for.

share|improve this answer

In answer to your first question, I'm going to refer you to another SO article: What does int argc, char *argv[] mean?

The first command line argument is always the command itself. So in your example:

./hw1q5 4 W# 3

There are four command line arguments: hw1q5, 4, W#, and 3.

In regards to your other questions, and the remainder of the first question, the majority of your problems stem from the assumption that sizeof(char*) returns the length of a null terminated string, which it does not (as has been pointed out both in comments and an earlier answer).

A good reference for understanding sizeof can be found here: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/sizeof, or as I suspect this is a homework assignment based on your compiled program name, your C++ textbook.

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