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Assuming I have a unix timestamp in PHP. How can I round my php timestamp to the nearest minute? E.g. 16:45:00 as opposed to 16:45:34?

Thanks for your help! :)

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16:45:00 still has seconds... I think you mean that you want to round to the next nearest minute, rather than remove seconds. – Layke Mar 2 '10 at 16:12
    
I'm just installed PHP so I can give you the code to do it. I don't want to guess cause I hate time() . I'll answer in 10 minutes if no one else has. – Layke Mar 2 '10 at 16:16
4  
@Laykes codepad.org is good for doing quick code checks – Yacoby Mar 2 '10 at 16:23
    
thanks Laykes! Yacoby provided what I was looking for. I'll edit my question to make it clearer. – Lyon Mar 2 '10 at 16:24
    
@Yacoby : Thats pretty cool. I just installed a WAMP stack anyway. I've bookmarked it. – Layke Mar 2 '10 at 16:26
up vote 40 down vote accepted

If the timestamp is a Unix style timestamp, simply

$rounded = round($time/60)*60;

If it is the style you indicated, you can simply convert it to a Unix style timestamp and back

$rounded = date('H:i:s', round(strtotime('16:45:34')/60)*60);

round() is used as a simple way of ensuring it rounds to x for values between x - 0.5 <= x < x + 0.5. If you always wanted to always round down (like indicated) you could use floor() or the modulo function

$rounded = floor($time/60)*60;
//or
$rounded = time() - time() % 60;
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Yacoby, thanks for the comprehensive explanation! Now that you've mentioned it, round() is the function I prefer to have. Makes more sense in my application. :) – Lyon Mar 2 '10 at 16:28

An alternative is this:

$t = time();
$t -= $t % 60;
echo $t;

I've read that each call to time() in PHP had to go all the way through the stack back to the OS. I don't know if this has been changed in 5.3+ or not? The above code reduces the calls to time()...

Benchmark code:

$ php -r '$s = microtime(TRUE); for ($i = 0; $i < 10000000; $i++); $t = time(); $t -= $t %60; $e = microtime(TRUE); echo $e - $s . "\n\n";'

$ php -r '$s = microtime(TRUE); for ($i = 0; $i < 10000000; $i++); $t = time() - time() % 60; $e = microtime(TRUE); echo $e - $s . "\n\n";'

$ php -r '$s = microtime(TRUE); for ($i = 0; $i < 10000000; $i++); $t = floor(time() / 60) * 60; $e = microtime(TRUE); echo $e - $s . "\n\n";'

Interestingly, over 10,000,000 itterations all three actually do the same time ;)

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Ah dam. Beat me to it :)

This was my solution also.

<?php 
$round = ( round ( time() / 60 ) * 60 );

echo date('h:i:s A', $round );
?>

http://php.net/manual/en/function.time.php

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hehe, i really appreciate your help! thanks :) – Lyon Mar 2 '10 at 16:26

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