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I have another question about this with getters and setters. Now that I started working with c# getters and setters as I understood them. The problem I see is that why should I make public variable that looks like this:

// Variable
private int _iRandomNumber
// Getter and setter
public int iRandomNumber
{
     get { return _iRandomNumber; }
     set { _iRandomNumber = value; }

}

I don't see the point of that since what different would it then be to just make the variable public since it's anyway got the get and set in the same bracket?

However if I do like this:

// Variable
private int _iRandomNumber
// Getter and setter
public int GetiRandomNumber { get { return _iRandomNumber; } }
public int SetiRandomNumber { set { _iRandomNumber = value; } }

Then when I try to use my SetiRandomNumber by itself Unity complier complains that I cannot use my SetProperty since I do not have a GET property inside my SET. Should I really have to make it like the first example I wrote because as I wrote then what's the point of Getters and Setters in c#?

Or should I instead move away from them, like I asked from the beginning and make functions for each Get and Set like in c++ so I can actually use them by themself?

Sorry for making this a new question, however it was not possible to add this as a comment in my previous question since it was to long.

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What did you write to have Unity compiler complains? And what is a reason for having public but separate properties to get and set field value instead of .. normal property? –  Sinatr May 14 at 9:06
    
The reason I wanted a different GET and a different SET was that I wanted some several other scripts to be able to Read the value, but not change it. While I just hade one other script that I wanted to change the variable. –  user3610422 May 14 at 9:16
    
It is still not clear what cause Unity compiler complains. I am not aware of scripting rules there. Could you show how you did that? Perhaps you could trick it with private gettter/setter? Example. –  Sinatr May 14 at 9:24
    
I tried doing this: this.GetComponent<ToD_Weather_Base>().SetiDaysBeforeWeatherChange += 1; Unity compiler: The property or indexer ToD_Weather_Base.SetiDaysBeforeWeatherChange' cannot be used in this context because it lacks the get' accessor But if this is the wrong way of using GET and SET maybe I should change it? And do the way that it seems like I should, put GET and SET in the same public variable. And only for variable that is read only I make a GET without SET. –  user3610422 May 14 at 9:30
    
Your mistake is +=, for this you obviously need getter and setter. –  Sinatr May 14 at 9:32
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3 Answers 3

Properties allow you to fire events when values are set, for instance:

public string Name {
    get { return name; }
    set {
        name = value;
        var eh = NameChanged;   // avoid race condition.
        if (eh != null)
            eh(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
private string name;
public event EventHandler NameChanged;

An added bonus is that you can track when your property gets set or read by putting breakpoints in the getter/setter with your debugger or diagnostic print statements.

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I don't see the point of that since what different would it then be to just make the variable public since it's anyway got the get and set in the same bracket?

The difference is that you're separating your implementation detail (a field) from your API (the property). You could later change the implementation, e.g. to use one long variable to serve two int fields. (That's just one random example.) Or you can provide validation and change notification in the setter. Or you can perform lazy computation in the getter. Or you can make the property read-only from the outside, but writable privately. The list goes on.

Your second code declares two different properties - one read-only, and one write-only, both backed by the same variable. That's non-idiomatic C# to say the least, and gives no benefit. There's no linkage between those two properties, whereas in the first version there's a clear link between the getter and the setter as they're parts of the same property.

One thing to note is that your first example can be more concisely expressed with an automatically implemented property:

// Removed unconventional "i" prefix; this follows .NET naming conventions.
public int RandomNumber { get; set; }

That creates a private variable behind the scenes, and a public property whose getter and setter just use the private variable. Later if you want to change the implementation, you can do so without affecting the API.

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Okay, I thought that I wanted to have one read only (my GET) and one set only (my SET) for my functions so I could from other scripts only read the variable or with my SET change it. However should I then make one GET that is read only for scripts and in my SET make it have both GET and SET to I can change it and read it? Sorry for the noob question, but I'm really new to getters and setters, especially in C#. –  user3610422 May 14 at 8:57
    
@user3610422: Why would you want one read-only property and one write-only property which modify the same data? It's really unclear what you're trying to achieve here, but fundamentally if you're expressing one piece of state, you should use one property. –  Jon Skeet May 14 at 8:58
    
@user3610422: Additionally, if you're very new to C# you might well benefit from stepping away from Unity for the moment, and learning C# in a more traditional environment. (Personally I think there's a lot of value in just writing console apps to start with - that lets you concentrate on learning the language and core classes without the burden of UI issues.) –  Jon Skeet May 14 at 8:59
    
Hmm, okay. I think I get the idea behind it. Thanks! Will go and do some C# regular tutorials and see if that helps me more. –  user3610422 May 14 at 9:04
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The advantage of getters and setters is that they mainly act as functions so you can do something like this

private int _iRandomNumber;

public int iRandomNumber
{
     get { return _iRandomNumber%10;} //you can do something like this mod function 
     set { _iRandomNumber = value+1000;} //you can manipulate the value being set 

} 

But if you do not have this kind of requirements on your variables, you might as well use just a public variable.

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