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http://addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/#modulepatternjavascript

I was going through the above master piece. I am still not able to get two things from the above article.

var myRevealingModule = (function () {

        var privateVar = "Ben Cherry",
            publicVar  = "Hey there!";

        function privateFunction() {
            console.log( "Name:" + privateVar );
        }

        function publicSetName( strName ) {
            privateVar = strName;
        }

        function publicGetName() {
            privateFunction();
        }


        // Reveal public pointers to
        // private functions and properties

        return {
            setName: publicSetName,
            greeting: publicVar,
            getName: publicGetName
        };

    })();

myRevealingModule.setName( "Paul Kinlan" );

Related question: JavaScript design pattern: difference between module pattern and revealing module pattern?

I understood many parts from the above question. Can anyone convert the above revealing module pattern into a traditional module pattern, so that i can visualize the difference.

share|improve this question
    
As far as I can tell, the revealing module pattern is just another way of doing module pattern. If you want another way of doing it, look at node.js modules (commonjs), or amd modules. That's sort of more just modules (in my mind at lest), cause there aren't any explicit closures. Though, in the end, it's basically just the same, it's just some of the code is generated for you. –  Alxandr May 14 '14 at 9:04
    
Also, a point about the code you posted above. publicVar isn't public, because myRevealingModule.greeting isn't a pointer, as proven here: jsfiddle.net/Xr2kB –  Alxandr May 14 '14 at 9:10

2 Answers 2

The module pattern code looks like the following: You can see the jsfiddle

var myModule = (function () {

    var privateVar = "Ben Cherry";

    function privateFunction() {
        console.log( "Name:" + privateVar );
    }

    return {
        setName: function( strName ) {
            privateVar = strName;
        },
        greeting: "Hey there!",
        getName: function() {
            privateFunction();
        }
    };

})();
myModule.setName( "Paul Kinlan" );
share|improve this answer

You have two options when avoiding the Revealing Module Pattern. You can either use a object literal or a stub return object.

Using an object literal:

var myRevealingModule = (function () {
   var privateVar = "Ben Cherry";

   function privateFunction() {
      console.log( "Name:" + privateVar );
   }

   return {
      setName: function( strName){
         privateVar = strName;
      },
      greeting: "Hey there!",
      getName: function() {
         privateFunction();
      }
   };

})();

Using a stub:

var myRevealingModule = (function () {
   var privateVar = "Ben Cherry";
   function privateFunction() {
       console.log( "Name:" + privateVar );
   }

   var stub = {};
   stub.greeting = "Hey there!";
   stub.setName = function ( strName ) {
      privateVar = strName;
   };
   stub.getName = function () {
      privateFunction();
   }
   return stub;

})();

The key point is to not put anything in the closure unless you intend to hide it. Don't put something in the closure and then "reveal" it later.

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