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We're considering using UUID values as primary keys for our MySQL database. The data being inserted is generated from dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of remote computers and being inserted at a rate of 100-40,000 inserts per second, and we'll never do any updates.

The database itself will typically get to around 50M records before we start to cull data, so not a massive database, but not tiny either. We're also planing to run on InnoDB, though we are open to changing that if there is a better engine for what we're doing.

We were ready to go with Java's Type 4 UUID, but in testing have been seeing some strange behavior. For one, we're storing as varchar(36) and I now realize we'd be better off using binary(16) - though how much better off I'm not sure.

The bigger question is: how badly does this random data screw up the index when we have 50M records? Would we be better off if we used, for example, a type-1 UUID where the leftmost bits were timestamped? Or maybe we should ditch UUIDs entirely and consider auto_increment primary keys?

I'm looking for general thoughts/tips on the performance of different types of UUIDs when they are stored as an index/primary key in MySQL. Thanks!

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one important detail is missing: are the primary keys to be generated by the logging server or by the client machines themselves? –  hop Mar 2 '10 at 19:19
    
@hop they are being generated by the 10-1000 clients that insert the data –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 2 '10 at 19:30
    
Where do you need the universal uniqueness in your scenario? My advice is to stick to auto_increment and use a separate field to describe the remote computer that sends the data. No need to reinvent the wheel here. –  Theodore Zographos Jul 20 '11 at 14:04
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7 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A UUID is a Universally Unique ID. It's the universally part that you should be considering here.

Do you really need the IDs to be universally unique? If so, then UUIDs may be your only choice.

I would strongly suggest that if you do use UUIDs, you store them as a number and not as a string. If you have 50M+ records, then the saving in storage space will improve your performance (although I couldn't say by how much).

If your IDs do not need to be universally unique, then I don't think that you can do much better then just using auto_increment, which guarantees that IDs will be unique within a table (since the value will increment each time)

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Our reason for considering UUIDs is because in some situations we will have 1000+ machines dumping data in, and I didn't want us getting blocked on central ID generation - though perhaps I'm being pennywise, pound foolish :) –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 2 '10 at 17:23
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Interesting point; this would parallelize the generation of the keys. I believe that this would increase the performance of key generation. However, you're choosing INSERT performance over SELECT performance if you use VARCHAR for storing the UUID. You most definitely should choose VARBINARY for storing to ensure SELECT performance. The extra step may impact INSERT performance, but you'll be paid off with the SELECT performance improvement. –  Dancrumb Mar 2 '10 at 17:40
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We ended up doing some benchmarking on real data and GUIDs w/o keys was pretty fast, GUIDs w/ keys was horrible (even when stored as BINARY), and int w/ AUTO_COMPLETE was the fastest. I think in our case, we were indeed missing the forest from the trees, as the sequence generation seemed inconsequential compared to the cost of storing more data + having a really crappy BTREE due to the randomness of the GUIDs –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 6 '10 at 14:15
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Strictly speaking, UUID is universally unique, meaning that it will never appear anywhere else in the world. You only need this if you're sharing your data publically. As for storing a UUID as a number, I don't mean in binary format. I mean as a 128 bit number, rather than a 288 bit string. For instance, the word 'hello' in ASCII is 68 65 6C 6C 6F, which is the number 448,378,203,247. Storing the string '68656C6C6F' requires 10 bytes. The number 448,378,203,247 requires only 5. All in all, unless you really need the first U in UUID, you can't do much better than auto_increment –  Dancrumb Jun 7 '12 at 14:37
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@Chamnap: Suggest you ask a Stack Overflow question :o) –  Dancrumb Jun 8 '12 at 13:36
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At my job, we use UUID as PKs. What I can tell you from experience is DO NOT USE THEM as PKs (SQL Server by the way).

It's one of those things that when you have less than 1000 records it;s ok, but when you have millions, it's the worst thing you can do. Why? Because UUID are not sequential, so everytime a new record is inserted MSSQL needs to go look at the correct page to insert the record in, and then insert the record. The really ugly consequence with this is that the pages end up all in different sizes and they end up fragmented, so now we have to do de-fragmentation periodic.

When you use an autoincrement, MSSQL will always go to the last page, and you end up with equally sized pages (in theory) so the performance to select those records is much better (also because the INSERTs will not block the table/page for so long).

However, the big advantage of using UUID as PKs is that if we have clusters of DBs, there will not be conflicts when merging.

I would recommend the following model: 1. PK INT Identity 2. Additional column automatically generated as UUID.

This way, the merge process is possible (UUID would be your REAL key, while the PK would just be something temporary that gives you good performance).

Hope this helps

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this should be the answer! –  nawfal Jun 27 '12 at 23:57
    
@KatLim Did you use the B-tree index instead of hash index? I don't think performance for UUID is any worse than auto_increment integers assuming you have used a hash index. –  Pacerier Jul 5 '12 at 22:20
    
I dont really know what those terms mean, but the fact is that the indexes need to be reindexed every month. If what you mention eliminates the reindexing task, I don't know but I can ask. –  Kat Lim Ruiz Jul 6 '12 at 0:50
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Something that I've been thinking is that this may not work that well for parent-child relationships. In this case, I think you have to add in the child table: parent-pk, parent-guid. Otherwise you could lose references between databases. I haven't thought of this too much, nor done any example, but this may be needed –  Kat Lim Ruiz Jul 11 '13 at 15:17
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@KatLimRuiz in sql server you can use the NEWSEQUENTIALID() technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189786.aspx to avoid the performance issue –  giammin Aug 29 '13 at 16:09
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Something to take into consideration is that Autoincrements are generated one at a time and cannot be solved using a parallel solution. The fight for using UUIDs eventually comes down to what you want to achieve versus what you potentially sacrifice.

On performance, briefly:

A UUID like the one above is 36 characters long, including dashes. If you store this VARCHAR(36), you're going to decrease compare performance dramatically. This is your primary key, you don't want it to be slow.

At its bit level, a UUID is 128 bits, which means it will fit into 16 bytes, note this is not very human readable, but it will keep storage low, and is only 4 times larger than a 32-bit int, or 2 times larger than a 64-bit int. I will use a VARBINARY(16) Theoretically, this can work without a lot of overhead.

I recommend reading the following two posts:

I reckon between the two, they answer your question.

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Actually, I read both those articles prior to posting this question, and I still didn't have a good answer here. For example, neither talk about type 1 vs type 4 UUIDS :( –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 2 '10 at 17:27
    
Fair that, I updated my answer a touch. I don't think it provides too much extra insight however. –  Kyle Rozendo Mar 2 '10 at 17:30
    
@Patrick: you put too many different topics into your question. –  hop Mar 2 '10 at 18:02
    
@Hop it's a complex topic :) –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 2 '10 at 18:10
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What about some hand crafted UID? Give each of the thousands of servers an ID and make primary key a combo key of autoincrement,MachineID ???

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I've thought about that and might need to run some benchmarks. Even a temporary local sequence on each of the 1000 machines, combined with timestamp, might be a enough. Ex: machine_id + temp_seq + timestamp –  Patrick Lightbody Mar 2 '10 at 18:11
    
Is it possible to have a temp_sequence that resets every timestamp tick? I'm not sure. –  MindStalker Mar 2 '10 at 18:45
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Since the primary key is generated decentralised, you don't have the option of using an auto_increment anyway.

If you don't have to hide the identity of the remote machines, use Type 1 UUIDs instead of UUIDs. They are easier to generate and can at least not hurt the performance of the database.

The same goes for varchar (char, really) vs. binary: it can only help matters. Is it really important, how much performance is improved?

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I would assign each server a numeric ID in a transactional manner. Then, each record inserted will just autoincrement its own counter. Combination of ServerID and RecordID will be unique. ServerID field can be indexed and future select performance based on ServerID (if needed) may be much better.

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I tend to avoid UUID simply because it is a pain to store and a pain to use as a primary key but there are advantages. The main one is they are UNIQUE.

I usually solve the problem and avoid UUID by using dual key fields.

COLLECTOR = UNIQUE ASSIGNED TO A MACHINE

ID = RECORD COLLECTED BY THE COLLECTOR (auto_inc field)

This offers me two things. Speed of auto-inc fields and uniqueness of data being stored in a central location after it is collected and grouped together. I also know while browsing the data where it was collected which is often quite important for my needs.

I have seen many cases while dealing with other data sets for clients where they have decided to use UUID but then still have a field for where the data was collected which really is a waste of effort. Simply using two (or more if needed) fields as your key really helps.

I have just seen too many performance hits using UUID. They feel like a cheat...

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