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I want to read each character from an existing wav file and assign it to a certain frequency.

I specifically want to transfer WAV files over sound from a phone to another like the "Chirp" android application.
And for that I need to map all the data to certain frequencies and play the generated tone so that the other phone can decode it and reconstitute the wav file.

Take a look at this: chirp.io/tech

For example the first line of a wave file is :

52 49 46 46 E0...

my idea is to do like:

5--> 100hz

2--> 200hz

4-->300hz ...

Is their a way to split them without changing the data?

i think i should mention that my wav file is formatted as:

static int sampleRate=44100;
static int numSample=duration*sampleRate;
long mySubChunk1Size = 16;
static short myBitsPerSample= 16;
int myFormat = 1;
static int myChannels = 1;
long myByteRate = sampleRate * myChannels * myBitsPerSample/8;
int myBlockAlign = myChannels * myBitsPerSample/8;
long myChunk2Size = generatedSnd.length* myChannels * myBitsPerSample/8;
long myChunkSize = 36 + myChunk2Size;
share|improve this question
    
Your question wasn't well formulated. Anyway, the way you are trying to do it is just... wrong. 0x59 is a byte (decimal: 89) but you want 2 different sounds from it (0x50 AND 0x09)? and you will need a map for every 256 bytes yo can have from 0x00 to 0xFF (decimal: 255). So, assigning 0x50 (decimal: 80) 100 Hz and 0x009 (decimal: 9) 200 Hz, again doesn't make much sense to me... – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:00
    
so you mean i should map like 00:100hz; 01:200hz.....FF:1000hz ?there will be lots of combinations.. – hanaa May 14 '14 at 12:14
1  
Yes, it's just better. But... I saw the chirpy page you linked. and elaborated something similar: I'm putting together an answer out of our discussion so far. – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:26
    
Now that I found a sense to the question, I retracted my close vote. I also reformulated your question adding in the explanatory comment that made it more meaningful. – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way you are trying to do it is simply... naive.

I tell you why:

  • 0x59 is a byte (decimal: 89) but you want 2 different sounds from it (0x50 and 0x09)?
    It doesn't seem a good idea, since you would have 2 frequencies (for the LSB and the MSB).
  • Moreover, you will need to map all the 256 byte values you can have in a file,
    from 0x00 to 0xFF (decimal: 255).
  • Plus, assigning 0x50 (decimal: 80) 100 Hz and 0x009 (decimal: 9) 200 Hz, again doesn't
    make much sense to me...

Now, a possible way to do that:
I would implement an algorithm such as (byte * 32) + 440 that gives me:

  • 440 Hz for 0x00, which is (0 * 32) + 440
  • ...
  • 3288 Hz for 0x59, which is (89 * 32) + 440
  • ...
  • 8600 Hz for 0xFF, which is (255 * 32) + 440.

All bytes will be "encoded" into frequencies in the audible spectrum.
In much a similar way to that used in the aforementioned "Chirp" method.

And I don't have to tell it that 0 is 440 Hz (nor any other association), the algorithm makes it for me.

Moreover, you can sen out (and receive) any kind of file. Not bad.

[EDIT]

Since the media (acoustic speakers/microphones) are limited to the Low Frequency range (audible sounds), you have to use audible sounds.
If you were to use Radio transmission, then you could use High Frequencies as well.

Since it really depends on construction quality. I suggested a "safe" range every speaker/microphone coupling will be able to deal with.

For reference on audible tones: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_frequency

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. but another question. why can't we encode bytes into high frequencies? for example from 17KHz and above? – hanaa May 14 '14 at 12:40
    
Well, the media (acoustic speakers/microphones) are limited to Low the Frequency range (audible sounds). If you were to use Radio transmission, then you could use High Frequencies as well. – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:43
    
I am testing some smartphone's speakers/microphones.. and i succeeded generating chirp signals till 20KHz and till 22KHz in tablets. to confirm that i can tel you that Microsoft and Samsung both dealed with frequencies over 16KHz in smartphones. – hanaa May 14 '14 at 12:48
    
Well, it really depends on construction quality. I suggested a "safe" range every speaker/microphone coupling will be able to deal with. For reference on audible tones: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_frequency – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:50
    
Funny enough, this discussion started like something without a sense and ended up into an interesting argument. ;) – Rotwang May 14 '14 at 12:53

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