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I know it only allows the class to set it, but what is the point?

How do I solve the problem of having readonly ids?

Say I have a person class:

public class Person
    {
        public string Name { get;  set; }
        public int Id { get; private set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }
    }

And this is in an Entities.dll, used by a GUI, BL and DAL.

The GUI calls the BL:

   List<Person> p =  BL.PeopleBL.GetPeople();

For the sake of the example calls the DAL:

...
while(dr.read())
{
    returnPersonList.add( new Person{ Age=dr.GetInt32(1), Id=dr.GetInt32(0), Name=dr.GetString(2)})
}
...

of course I cannot do that cause Id is a private set; What is the proper way to do this?

How can I let the BL/Dal set the Id, but not on the GUI?

Or is this not even the proper use of a private set?


I just wanted to add that this is your typical DB app, where the pk is the Id and should not be changed( only by the BL/DAL)


share|improve this question
    
@Eric: What do you gain from a private set? Are you attempting to protect this variable from something? –  Joel Etherton Mar 2 '10 at 19:34
12  
@Joel everything should always be private unless there's a highly specific demand otherwise. There shouldn't be a compelling reason to protect a member, that's the default. –  Rex M Mar 2 '10 at 19:35

9 Answers 9

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This is one possible solution although not very clean:

  1. Make the property you need to expose to BAL & DAL internal
  2. Mark BAL.dll & DAL.dll Internal Visible in assemblyinfo.cs

public class Person
{
    public Person(int id)
    {
         this.Id=id;
    }

    public string Name { get;  set; }
    public int Id { get; internal set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

AssemblyInfo.cs for Entities.dll

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("DAL"), InternalsVisibleTo("BAL")]

That way all your internals will be visible to DAL & BAL. This may not be desirable but I'm just suggesting one possible solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I wonder why this did not get upvoted. Is this the wrong solution to the problem? Sound like I get the best of everything with this. –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 20:57
    
Would this still be required if I ILMerged the BL/DAL/Entites –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 21:04

The two common approaches are either that the class should have a constructor for the DAL to use, or the DAL should use reflection to hydrate objects.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for the constructor. –  Tim Jarvis Mar 2 '10 at 19:35
    
+1 for the constructor, but reflection is all wet. –  kenny Mar 2 '10 at 20:37
    
I have used the CTor before, it just seemed wrong. That got me thinking why have a set when I can use a get; with a backing field. As you can guess the Id is just the pk from the data store and should not be changed. –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 20:54
    
I will accept this one as most agree with this solution, bau am going to try the InternalsVisibleTo answer below –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 21:06
1  
@Kenny thats how LINQ to SQL, etc works. –  Rex M Mar 2 '10 at 21:22

Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but if you want truly readonly Ids why not use an actual readonly field?

public class Person
{
   public Person(int id)
   {
      m_id = id;
   }

   readonly int m_id;
   public int Id { get { return m_id; } }
}
share|improve this answer

Or you can do

public class Person
{
    public Person(int id)
    {
         this.Id=id;
    }

    public string Name { get;  set; }
    public int Id { get; private set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have used the CTor before, it just seemed wrong. That got me thinking why have a set when I can use a get; with a backing field. As you can guess the Id is just the pk from the data store and should not be changed. –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 20:57

You can let the user set a read-only property by providing it through the constructor:

public class Person
{
    public Person(int id)
    {
        this.Id = id;
    }

    public string Name { get;  set; }
    public int Id { get; private set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have used the CTor before, it just seemed wrong. That got me thinking why have a set when I can use a get; with a backing field. As you can guess the Id is just the pk from the data store and should not be changed. –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 20:58

Perhaps, you can have them marked as internal, and in this case only classes in your DAL or BL (assuming they are separate dlls) would be able to set it.

You could also supply a constructor that takes the fields and then only exposes them as properties.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I tried, works great.. [assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("testDAL")] –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 21:40

This is normally the case then the ID is not a natural part of the entity, but a database artifact that needs be abstracted away.

It is a design decision - to only allow setting the ID during construction or through method invocation, so it is managed internally by the class.

You can write a setter yourself, assuming you have a backing field:

private int Id = 0;
public void SetId (int id)
{
  this.Id = id;
}

Or through a constructor:

private int Id = 0;
public Person (int id)
{
  this.Id = id;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think if I used setId then any consumer of my API could change it, which is what I do not want. But I have done it this way before –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 20:56
while(dr.read())
{
    returnPersonList.add( 
        new Person(dr.GetInt32(1), dr.GetInt32(0), dr.GetString(2)));
}

where:

public class Person
{
    public Person(int age, int id, string name) 
    {
        Age = age;
        Id = id;
        Name = name;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi John - Just browsing SO for a bit waiting for a build seeing if I can learn stuff. I'm curious. Did you mean to leave in Id= and Name= ? –  J M Mar 2 '10 at 19:48
    
@JM: Yes. It's a constructor. Why would I not leave them? –  John Saunders Mar 2 '10 at 19:54
    
I know it is a ctor :) I was curious because I could not get it to compile. I copied over the class with your ctor and the 3 properties. I called the ctor on it's own i.e. var x = new Person(20, Id=1, Name="X"); This gave errors: "The name 'Id' does not exist in the current context" and same for Name. Calling the ctor without the Id= and Name= works and var y = new Person() {Name = "Blah", Age = 20}; works if you add a default ctor. I didn't know you could mix the two so I thought I try it. If it's possible, any idea why I'm getting the error? –  J M Mar 2 '10 at 20:14
    
@John: new Person(dr.GetInt32(1), Id=dr.GetInt32(0), Name=dr.GetString(2))) –  Tanzelax Mar 2 '10 at 20:15
    
@J M: You're correct, it's not possible, and that was a copy/paste error. –  Tanzelax Mar 2 '10 at 20:15

Depending on the scope of my application, I like to put the object hydration mechanisms in the object itself. I'll wrap the data reader with a custom object and pass it a delegate that gets executed once the query returns. The delegate gets passed the DataReader. Then, since I'm in my smart business object, I can hydrate away with my private setters.

Edit for Pseudo-Code

The "DataAccessWrapper" wraps all of the connection and object lifecycle management for me. So, when I call "ExecuteDataReader," it creates the connection, with the passed proc (there's an overload for params,) executes it, executes the delegate and then cleans up after itself.

public class User
{
    public static List<User> GetAllUsers()
    {
        DataAccessWrapper daw = new DataAccessWrapper();
        return (List<User>)(daw.ExecuteDataReader("MyProc", new ReaderDelegate(ReadList)));
    }

    protected static object ReadList(SQLDataReader dr)
    {
        List<User> retVal = new List<User>();
        while(dr.Read())
        {
            User temp = new User();
            temp.Prop1 = dr.GetString("Prop1");
            temp.Prop2 = dr.GetInt("Prop2");
            retVal.Add(temp);
        }
        return retVal;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This sounds interesting, would you have some psudo code to share? –  Eric Mar 2 '10 at 21:42
    
Sample code added to my answer. –  Jacob G Mar 2 '10 at 23:18
    
Thanks for adding that, seems like that won't work me as in my implementation my entities(user) exist in many tiers and know nothing of the datastore. –  Eric Mar 3 '10 at 0:34

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