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The book's I'm using to learn C explains something called "prototypes" which I couldn't understand properly. In the book, the following sample code explains these "prototypes". What does this mean here? What are the "prototypes"?

//* two_func.c -- a program using two functions in one file */
#include <stdio.h>
void butler(void);
int main(void)
{
    printf("I will summon the butler function.\n");
    butler();
    printf("Yes! bring me some tea and writable DVD's.\n");
    getchar();
    return 0;
}

void butler(void)   /*start of function definition*/

{
    printf("You rang,sir.\n");

}

Please explain in simple terms.

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defined in your header files, declarations of functions. in your example you have no header file so you simply declared the butler() in the source. –  T McKeown May 14 at 17:55
1  
What does the book say about this? –  stefan May 14 at 17:55
1  
comment out your prototype and then try to run your code –  buck May 14 at 17:55
1  
In the future, it's usually helpful to answerers if you describe the things you do understand, however little and confused that might be. –  Josh Caswell May 14 at 18:03
    
@stefan The C90 standard added prototypes, and older compilers might not recognize them. (We’ll tell you what to do when using such compilers in a moment.) A prototype declares to the compiler that you are using a particular function, so it’s called a function declaration . It also specifies properties of the function. For example, the first void in the prototype for the butler() function indicates that butler() does not have a return value. (In general, a function can return a value to the calling function for its use, but butler() doesn’t.) –  Coldplay May 14 at 18:52

5 Answers 5

Function prototypes (also called "forward declarations") declare functions without providing the "body" right away. You write prototypes in addition to the functions themselves in order to tell the compiler about the function that you define elsewhere:

Your prototype void butler(void); does all of the following things:

  • It tells the compiler that function butler exists,
  • It tells that butler takes no parameters, and
  • It tells that butler does not return anything.

Prototypes are useful because they help you hide implementation details of the function. You put your prototypes in a header file of your library, and place the implementation in a C file. This lets the code that depends on your library to be compiled separately from your code - a very important thing.

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what do you mean by "no arguments" and "not return antyhing" ?? –  Coldplay May 14 at 18:01
    
@user3205705 I mean function parameters, the data that you can pass into the function. –  dasblinkenlight May 14 at 18:04
    
One more thing, line 3 -- void butler(void); -- uses parentheses while line 13 -- void butler(void) -- don't uses it? what difference are the parentheses actually making? –  Coldplay May 14 at 18:07
    
Generally it is like a "warm-up" for the compiler.Compiler is clever enough to compile the file and run fine,in most circumstances,even if you do not provide him prototypes of functions!It is a good practice to declare prototypes in order to help your compiler! –  Themis Beris May 14 at 18:08
    
@user3205705 I assume that by "parentheses" you mean curly braces (i.e. { and }) not the regular "round" parentheses present on both lines. It is the absence of the curly braces that makes the prototype a prototype, rather than a full-blown function definition. If you put curly braces after a prototype instead of a semicolon ;, you end up with a function definition that happens to have an empty body. Such "do nothing" functions are perfectly fine - C allows them, and they are also useful when you want to compile and run some partially implemented code. –  dasblinkenlight May 14 at 18:27

This is the prototype:

void butler(void);

Basically it defines butler as a function that takes no parameters and has no return value. It allows the compiler to continue onwards, even though the butler function has not yet really been defined. Note that the prototype doesn't contain any actual code. It simply defines what the butler function looks like from the outside. The actual code can come later in the file.

If your code had been

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    butler(); // note this line
}

void butler() { return; }

The compiler would have stopped at the note this line section, complaining that butler() doesn't exist. It will not scan the whole file first for functions, it'll simply stop at the first undefined function call it encounters.

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Actually, it may just issue a warning about implicit declaration and move on. An implicit function declaration is not a compilation error (though I agree it should be; no one should be relying on implicit declarations these days) –  Filipe Gonçalves May 14 at 17:59
    
@FilipeGonçalves the diagnostic is required and a program that requires a diagnostic is not a strictly conforming program. Moreover an implementation may refuse to translate it. –  ouah May 14 at 18:10

Prototype comprises the return type of a function, its name and the order of different types of parameters that you pass it. If you write the function definition before calling the function, then a prototype is not necessary. But, as is the case in your example, the function butler() is called BEFORE its definition and so, a prototype is necessary to tell the compiler that such a function exists which will have so and so return type and parameters. Otherwise, writing the function definition after calling the function will result in error.

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thanks mate you made my day –  Coldplay May 14 at 18:02
    
One more thing, line 3 -- void butler(void); -- uses parentheses while line 13 -- void butler(void) -- don't uses it? what difference are the parentheses actually making? –  Coldplay May 14 at 18:18
    
Oh no parenthesis differentiate a variable from a function, and you are welcome. –  Rabbiya Shahid May 15 at 17:15

In this context prototype is a more generic term for what in C would be called a function declaration, i.e.:

void butler(void);

You may also find it called function signature. Both terms actually refer more to how butler() is defined from a conceptual point of view, as a function that doesn't take any argument and doesn't return a value, rather that to the fact that its declaration is enough for you to use it in your source code.

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void butler(void);

Is Called prototype or declaration of function.

And below is the function definition.

void butler(void)   /*function definition */

{
    printf("You rang,sir.\n");

}
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