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As I'm developing micro-services using Dropwizard I'm trying to find a balance between having many resources on one running instance/application of Dropwizard versus many instances.

For example - I have a project-A having 3 resources. In another project-B I would like to use one of the resources in project-A. The resource in common is related to user data. Now I have options like :

  • make http call to user resource in project-A from project-B. I can use client approach of dropwizard here
  • as user resource is common - I can take it out from project-A to say project-C. And the I need to create client code in both project-A and project-B
  • i can extract jar containing user code and use in project-B. this will avoid making http calls.

Another point where I would like to have expert opinion is how to balance/minimize network calls associated with communication between different instances of microservice. In general should one use http to communicate between different instances? or can any other inter-process communication approach be used for performance perse [particularly if different instances are on same system]?

I feel this could be common problem/confusion for new comers in the world of micro-services. And hence would like to know any general guideline or best practices.

many thanks

Pradeep

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3 Answers 3

make http call to user resource in project-A from project-B. I can use client approach of dropwizard here

I would not pursue this option if I were you. It's going to slow down your service unnecessarily, create potential logging headaches, and just feels wrong. The only time this might make sense is when the code is out of your control (but even then there's probably a better solution).

as user resource is common - I can take it out from project-A to say project-C. And the I need to create client code in both project-A and project-B

i can extract jar containing user code and use in project-B. this will avoid making http calls.

It sounds like project A and project B are logically different units with some common dependencies. It might make sense to consider a multi-module project (or a multi-module Maven project if you're using Maven). You could have a module containing any common code (and resources) that gets referenced by separate project modules. This is where Maven really excels since it can manage all these dependencies for you. It's like a combination of the last two options you listed.

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As of now I'm also inclined towards multi-module projects. –  user1050134 May 16 '14 at 13:43

That's essentially a design choice: are you ready to trade the simplicity of each one of your small services against the complexity of having to orchestrate them and the outcome of the overall latency.

If you choose the small service approach, you could stick to the documentation guidelines at http://dropwizard.io/manual/core.html#organizing-your-project : 1 project with 3 modules for api (that can be referenced from consumers), application and the optional client (also potentially used in consumers)

Other questions you will have to answer: - each of your service will be hosted on a separate SCM repository...or not - each of your service could (should?) have it's own version

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One of the main advantages of micro-services is the opportunity to release and deploy each of them separately. Whatever option you choose make sure you don't loose this property. Another property of a micro-service should be that it has only one responsibility. So it is all about finding the right boundaries for your services (in DDD-terms 'bounded contexts'), and indeed it is not easy to find the right boundaries. It is a balancing act. For instance in your theoretical case: If the communication between A and C will be very chatty, then it is not a great idea to extract C. If A and C have a different lifecycle (business-wise), then it is a good idea to extract C.

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