Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm pretty new to developing in golang, so if this is an elementary question I apologize. I didn't see a comparable question already asked; if there is one, please point me to it (thanks).

The full code (at the time of my asking this question, since it's not immutable) is at http://play.golang.org/p/idDp1E-vZo

I've declared a struct with four primitive fields, and I'm reading the values destined for Node.ipaddr from a file on the local filesystem (I'm getting the value of fileName as a flag at runtime; that code is trimmed out here but is in the link provided above.)

type Node struct {
    hostname string
    ipaddr   string
    pstatus  string
    ppid     int
}

file, err := os.Open(fileName)
if err != nil {
    panic(fmt.Sprintf("error opening %s: %v", fileName, err))
}

Because the file is line-delimited, I thought a bufio.Scanner would be ideal for reading the data from the file. Where I am struggling is finding an elegant way to actually pass the data into the struct elements.

I created an array of Node elements, and have considered a map, but I am not sure how I'd make practical use of it (yet).

var nodes []*Node
var nodemap = make(map[string]*Node) //do I even need this?

scanner := bufio.NewScanner(file)
for scanner.Scan() {
    if err := scanner.Err(); err != nil {
        fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "error reading from file:", err)
        os.Exit(3)
    }

    //pass scanner.Text() into Node.ipaddr

}

Short of wrapping scanner.Scan() in an indexed for loop, I'm not at all sure how to proceed. If I do wrap scanner.Scan() in an indexed for loop, will the for loop be able to handle EOF elegantly -- I guess I'm not sure what the index limit/max comparison value should be in that case.

As always, thanks for any advice that you're willing to offer.

edit: The format of the input file is like this:

10.1.1.1
10.1.1.2
10.1.1.3

I anticipate approx 150 entries in the file, one IPv4 address per line.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you have control over the file's format? also show an example of the file somewhere if not. –  OneOfOne May 14 at 22:15
    
yes, I have control over the format. Will edit OP to put the current format, but they are IPv4 addresses, one per line. –  Patrick May 14 at 23:04
    
Given the current scenario, the easiest thing to do is just scan each line as you are doing and parse the ip using: golang.org/pkg/net/#ParseIP, then you can simply assign the result of the parsed value to your Node values as needed. –  Ralph Caraveo May 14 at 23:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only thing you're missing is the append function to add a new node to the slice.

nodes = append(nodes, &Node{ipaddr: scanner.Text()})

Also, you can have an index on your for loop while still having the scanner.Scan() as the condition. This lets the EOF be handled elegantly while still allowing you to access that new Node if need be.

for i := 0; scanner.Scan(); i++ {
    if err := scanner.Err(); err != nil {
        fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "error reading from file:", err)
        os.Exit(3)
    }

    nodes = append(nodes, &Node{ipaddr: scanner.Text()})
    fmt.Println(nodes[i])
}

Full code: http://play.golang.org/p/RvMQp-jgWF

share|improve this answer

You could use something along the lines of this :

func main() {
    file := strings.NewReader(IPS) //os.Open(fileName)

    var nodes []*Node

    scanner := bufio.NewScanner(file)
    for scanner.Scan() {
        if err := scanner.Err(); err != nil {
            fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "error reading from file:", err)
            os.Exit(3)
        }
        ip := net.ParseIP(scanner.Text())
        if ip != nil {
            nodes = append(nodes, &Node{ipaddr: net.ParseIP(scanner.Text())})
        }

    }
    for _, n := range nodes {
        fmt.Printf("%s, %+v\n", n.ipaddr, n)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I think this is a good solution provided that the file contents are always IP addresses. I selected the other answer because I think it will provide a more generic pattern, but I'll also be leveraging what I learn from this solution as well. upvoted for the context; thank you. –  Patrick May 15 at 2:35
    
A tip for programming in Go, always try to be specific with your data, it will make your code better, faster and harder to break. –  OneOfOne May 21 at 19:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.