Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So right now I have the following:

public class Panel extends JPanel {

int size;

public Panel()
{
    JButton newBut = new JButton();

    newBut.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
        {
            boolean validInput = false;
            while (!validInput)
            {
                String input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Please specify a number:");
                try{
                    size = Integer.parseInt(input);
                    validInput = true;
                } catch (NumberFormatException ex){
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(new JFrame(), "Invalid Input!", "ERROR",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
                }

                if (input == null)
                {
                    validInput = true;
                }
            }
        }
    });
}

Now as you can see from the code, I am trying to parse the input from the user as an integer, and then store that value inside my global variable "size". However, when I try to do this I get the error:

Cannot refer to a non-final variable inside an inner class defined in a different method

Setting size to final is not an option for me, since I need size to be able to change each time the user inputs a new value. So I honestly have no idea how I'm supposed to retrieve the size variable from the inner method. Any help would be mightily appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
hmm, I like these types of bugs. Thanks actually I need to brush up on this. The whole static vs. non-static & final vs non-final. access privileges & such . It's very very important to grok it –  Coffee May 15 at 2:05
    
a good source - stackoverflow.com/questions/1299837/… –  Coffee May 15 at 2:06
1  
Cannot reproduce. Your code compiles for me. Java 1.7.0. The error message applies to a method-local variable, not a class member. Clearly this isn't the real code. –  EJP May 15 at 2:48

2 Answers 2

Yes @EJP is right....I have also tried in Java 8 using netbeans...for me it is working perfectly...but if still you get problem then implement ActionListener to your class and then make a separate method for this...here is the code....

public class Panel extends JPanel implements ActionListener{

    int size;

    public Panel()
    {
        JButton newBut = new JButton("Button");  //give some name just to check..
        newBut.addActionListener(this);
        this.add(newBut);  //you have not added your button to the Panel..so I did it
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {  //same method just outside the inner class
        boolean validInput = false;   //all the functionality is same as your nothing is changed
        while (!validInput)
        {
            String input = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Please specify a number:");
            try{
                size = Integer.parseInt(input);
                validInput = true;
            } catch (NumberFormatException ex){
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(new JFrame(), "Invalid Input!", "ERROR",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
            }

            if (input == null)
            {
                validInput = true;
            }
        }
    }
    }

I think it may help you...

share|improve this answer

You could cheat and use an AtomicInteger or similar, and call its set(int) method. But I would instead reconsider your design -- why are you trying to stash this value in a global anyways?

Also, what's with the floating

if (input == null)
{
    validInput = true;
}

block?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes you can. I do it all the time. What you can't do is set a method-local variable in the enclosing method. That doesn't appear in this question. –  EJP May 15 at 2:27
    
D'oh, you're right -- I misread the OP's question based on the quoted compiler message. –  Tom G May 15 at 12:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.